Business Week Business Week
23 - 26 June
From London to Rio: The Business and Politics of Mega Sport Events

Business Week 2014

From London to Rio: The Business and Politics of Mega Sport Events

The School of Business, Economics and Informatics is pleased to have hosted Business Week 2014. Continuing from the huge success of previous years, this year the focus was on the Business and Politics of Mega Sport Events. Please see below for the full schedule of events that took place.

Monday 23 June

3pm to 5pm

Film in Birkbeck Cinema - Waste Land

Waste Land is a feature documentary that premiered at the 2010 Sundance Film Festival and went on to be nominated for the Oscar for Best Documentary Feature at the 83rd Annual Academy Awards.

Contemporary artist Vik Muniz takes us on an emotional journey from Jardim Gramacho, the world's largest landfill on the outskirts of Rio de Janeiro, to the heights of international art stardom. Vik collaborates with the brilliant catadores, pickers of recyclable materials, and shows us how to recycle ourselves.

5pm to 6pm

Drinks Reception in the Clore Management Centre

6pm

Introduction by Professor Philip Powell

Pro Vice-Master (Enterprise and Innovation) and Executive Dean, School of Business, Economics and Informatics, Birkbeck

The Andrew Booth Memorial Lecture

Richard Ayers: The impact of digital technology and social media on sport

Richard AyersDigital technology and social media are playing an increasingly important role in the business of sport, particularly in the management of sports events. This keynote and panel session will discuss contemporary usage and possible future trends in digital technology and social media in sport. The keynote speaker, Richard Ayers, is the founder and CEO of Seven League, a digital media firm with a specialism in sport. He has worked as Head of Digital for Manchester City FC and is also proud to have helped Channel 4 with their digital coverage of the Paralympics 2012.

Richard will discuss his rich experience in the field, drawing on his knowledge of music, film, newspapers and publishing, as well as sport. In particular, he will examine:

  • the capacity sports organisations have to facilitate and moderate engagement from various audiences;
  • the ways in which social media can be used for the good of sport; and
  • issues around data visualisation and 'datatainment'.


6.30pm to 7.30pm

Panel discussion

The panel members will each introduce themselves, explain their backgrounds and views on digital technology and social media and discuss how these technologies were used in London 2012 and how they are being (and will be) used in Rio. In particular, the panellists will discuss what the challenges are that sports organisations and host cities face in this field. There will also be an opportunity for a lively question-and-answer session.

Panel members

  • Alex Balfour: Former Chief Digital Officer at the Engine Group and Head of New Media at LOCOG
  • Tom Thirwall: CEO, Bigballs Films
  • Dan McLaren: Founder and Editor-in-Chief, UK Sports Network
  • Gill Leivesley: Management Consultant, Takeout
  • Professor George Roussos: Professor of Pervasive Computing, Birkbeck

Topics will include the ability of sports organisations to facilitate and moderate engagement from various audiences, the ways in which social media can be used for the good of sport and challenges around data visualisation and 'datatainment'.

7.30pm to 8.30pm

Closing Refreshments and Networking

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Tuesday 24 June

3pm to 5pm

Film in Birkbeck Cinema - Linha de Passe

Linha de Passe is a 2008 Brazilian film directed by Walter Salles and Daniela Thomas. The film stars Vinícius de Oliveira and Sandra Corveloni, who won the Best Actress Award at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival for her role.

It tells the story of four poverty-stricken half-brothers with the same mother, but different fathers, who live in a suburban neighbourhood in the periphery of São Paulo and have to fight to follow their dreams.

5pm to 6.45pm

Costa Rica vs. England on the Big Screen

Join us for a live screening of England's final group match in the Clore Management Centre

7.15pm to 8.15pm

Introduction by Professor Philip Powell

Pro Vice-Master (Enterprise and Innovation) and Executive Dean, School of Business, Economics and Informatics, Birkbeck

The Alec Rodger Memorial Lecture

Adrian Moorhouse MBE: What can business learn from sport?

Adrian MoorhouseThere is always a great deal of discussion about what sport can learn from business. Over the last two decades, many people with business backgrounds have moved into senior positions within sport and several programmes (such as the FTSE-BOA Initiative around London 2012) have sought to encourage sport organisations to learn from business organisations. But what about the other way round? What can business learn from sport?

In this keynote address, Olympic gold medallist Adrian Moorhouse MBE will discuss how concepts within sport psychology, and organisational psychology more broadly, can help to create high performance business environments.

Specifically, he will look at issues of leadership, team development, talent management, communication and engagement. Immediately after the keynote address, there will be a chance for questions and further discussion.

Adrian Moorhouse, Olympic gold medallist and Managing Director of Lane 4, helps organisations build competitive advantage through individual and team development. Voted Best Leader in The Sunday Times contest Best Small Companies to Work For in 2007 and 2009, he has been listed in HR Magazine's Most Influential UK Thinkers since 2010.



8.15pm to 9.15pm

Closing Refreshments and Networking

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Wednesday 25 June

3pm to 5pm

Film in Birkbeck Cinema — Senna

Senna is a British 2010 documentary that depicts the life and death of Brazilian motor-racing champion, Ayrton Senna. The film's narrative focuses on Senna's career in Formula One, with particular emphasis on his rivalry with fellow driver Alain Prost. The film relies primarily on archive racetrack footage and home video clips provided by the Senna family, rather than retrospective video interviews, and has no formal commentary.

6pm to 6.30pm

Introduction by Professor Philip Powell

Pro Vice-Master (Enterprise and Innovation) and Executive Dean, School of Business, Economics and Informatics, Birkbeck

The Ronald Tress Memorial Lecture

Neale Coleman CBE: Economic regeneration and the impact of major sporting events

Neale ColemanIn recent years, there has been increasing competition for the rights to host major sport events. One of the key reasons used by those supporting bids is that the event can be used as a catalyst for economic regeneration. The Barcelona Olympics in 1992 is often held up as an example of successful economic regeneration, with the event having provided the impetus for expenditure on transport infrastructure, office and hotel developments.

In the UK, the strategy of using sport events to promote urban regeneration and create leisure, retail and tourism facilities in former industrial cities was popular in the 1980s and 1990s, while the creation of Regional Development Agencies in the 1990s used sport as a catalyst for regional economic development and further consolidated the link between sport events and economic regeneration. This belief in the role of major sport events and economic regeneration is one reason underpinning the increasing emphasis placed on bidding for and hosting sport events by the BRICS. This session poses some key questions, such as:

  • What insights into the economic development of the BRICS are provided by the staging of major sport events?
  • Are major sport events a catalyst for growth?
  • To what extent has the London Olympics been a catalyst for economic regeneration in East London?

The session begins with a keynote address given by Neale Coleman, Deputy Chair of the London Legacy Development Corporation. Neale will focus on the extent to which the London Olympics has acted as a catalyst for stimulating economic development, particularly in East London.



6.30pm to 7.30pm

Panel Discussion

After the keynote address, members of the panel will introduce themselves and present their views on the economic impact of major sport events and the impact of major events on regeneration. In particular, the panellists will discuss the challenges faced by the BRICS in using major sport events as a stimulus for economic regeneration. There will also be an opportunity for a question-and-answer session. Panel members:

  • Professor John Driffill: Professor of Economics, Birkbeck, Department of Economics, Mathematics and Statistics
  • Professor Maurice Roche: Emeritus Professor of Sociology, University of Sheffield
  • Professor Chris Gratton: Emeritus Professor of Sport Economics Sheffield Hallam University
  • Stephen Gifford: Former Director of Economics, Confederation of British Industry (CBI)

7.30pm to 8.30pm

Closing Refreshments and Networking

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Thursday 26 June

One day Conference — Managing Major Sport Events: Governance and Legacy

Every Major / Mega Sport Event poses two interlocking challenges for the organising city / country:

(1) the obvious one of making a success of the operational management of the event - a huge success on the part of the London 2012 Olympics, less so for the Delhi XIX 2010 Commonwealth Games; and

(2) the less obvious but almost equally important one of managing the relationship with the international sport governing body partner - for example FIFA in relation to the football World Cup and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in relation to the Olympic Games.

The international sport governing bodies have in their gift a major prize in terms of international prestige, international relations, and possible economic and social legacy, the right to award the right to host a major event. But the award of a major event also contains many of the elements of a "poison chalice": the operational demands are complex and extremely expensive; the sport governing bodies all espouse the highest ethical standards, claims which attract particular and legitimate civic society and media attention which also places the host city/country in the international spotlight; the halo effect for the organising country/city of being associated with a particular governing body brings its own complexities where that organisation becomes mired in controversy as the IOC did following the 1998 Salt Lake City bribery scandal, and FIFA did following the allegations of corruption around the award of the 2018 and 2022 FIFA World Cups to Russia and Qatar respectively.

The series of debates on day four of Birkbeck Business Week explores the complexity of the inter-relationships between host organising cities/countries and the respective sport governing bodies, with a view to offering some guidance on how they might most successfully combine to achieve a successful event and a successful legacy.

9.30am to 10am

Coffee and Registration at the Clore Management Centre, Birkbeck

10am to 11am

Introduction by Professor Philip Powell

Pro Vice-Master (Enterprise and Innovation) and Executive Dean, School of Business, Economics and Informatics, Birkbeck

Setting the scene — the social-cultural context of Brazil and a discussion of sport's place in the country

Chair: Professor Linda Trenberth
Professor of Management and Dean of Business School, Griffith University, Australia

Speaker: David Goldblatt
Author and Social Commentator

Brazil is one of the BRICS nations. A characteristic of the BRICS has been the way in which each of the countries have aggressively bid for major international sport events as, in part, a means of announcing their 'arrival' into the top tier of global economic powers: Brazil (the 2014 FIFA World Cup and 2016 Olympic Games); Russia (the 2018 FIFA World Cup); India (the Commonwealth Games Delhi 2012); China (the 2008 Olympic Games); and South Africa (the 2010 FIFA World Cup).

It has been argued the hosting of such mega sporting events is a vehicle for the exercising of "soft power" on the world diplomatic stage It is also argued that such events act as a catalyst for stimulating economic development, in the case of the London 2012 Olympic Games to stimulate the economic and social revival of East London.

Organising a FIFA World Cup and Olympic Games is extremely expensive. And FIFA is currently embroiled in a major governance reform process following allegations of corruption in the award of the 2018 and 2022 World Cup hosting rights. Brazil has only recently established a functioning democracy after many years of military dictatorship, and has made great strides in developing its economy and raising the living standards of its citizens. However, it continues to face great challenges in both social and economic development. A central question for Brazilian society is, is staging two major sport mega-events – the FIFA World Cup (2014) and the Olympic Games (2016) – the most effective investment of its resources? This decision is complicated by the central role of football in the cultural life, and indeed identity, of Brazil as a nation.

In his introductory keynote presentation David Goldblatt:

  • Outlines the recent political, economic and social history of Brazil.
  • Explains the role of sport/football in Brazilian society.
  • Explains why Brazil bid for the two events.
  • Explains why so many Brazilian citizens are voicing their opposition to the cost of hosting the FIFA World Cup via street protest.
  • Presents an assessment of how FIFA, and the IOC, are viewed in Brazil in terms of their suitability as international, organisational "role models" given their historic governance problems, in particular those of FIFA.
  • Speculates on what the likely legacy for the World Cup and Olympic Games will be for Brazil.
  • Speculates on what the likely legacy for FIFA, and the IOC, will be of the Brazil World Cup. UEFA has decided to host the 2020 UEFA Euro tournament across Europe and not in one country – is the tide turning against one city/country mega events?

11.15am to 1pm

Speaker and Panel Discussion

Good governance in sport: a real event

Chair: Professor Klaus Nielsen
Professor of Institutional Economics, Birkbeck

Speaker: Jens Sejer Andersen
International Director, Play the Game and the Danish Institute of Sport

Play the Game is the leading anti-corruption NGO in the sport governance field. In his address Jens Andersen will present an overview of the current quality of governance at the world's two leading international sport governing bodies: the IOC and FIFA. He will specifically contrast how the IOC responded to the 1998 Salt Lake City bribery scandal to FIFA's response to the wider corruption allegations following the 2018 and 2022 World Cup bidding process.

Following on from Jens Andersen’s presentation the panel will address the following questions:

David Goldblatt Writer and Social Commentator

In terms of allowing a BRICS country to develop its social/cultural capital, do the staging of the FIFA World Cup and Olympic Games assist or hinder Brazil's?

Alan Tomlinson Professor of Leisure Studies, University of Brighton

Drawing on a critical assessment of FIFA and the IOC as governing bodies and espouses of the highest levels of ethical standards, to what extent do the organisations offer a positive or negative "halo" effect to Brazil? Before placing demands on host cities/countries do they first need to reform themselves?

Ali Guven Lecturer in International Relations, Politics Department, Birkbeck

In terms of the international economic development aspiration of a BRICS country, do the staging of the FIFA World Cup and Olympic Games assist its economic objectives? Are they a case of inefficient resource allocation?

Klaus Nielsen Professor of Institutional Economics, Birkbeck

Presenting an over-arching analysis, from the perspective of a small European country, Denmark, with a strong sport culture and highly developed governance structures in civic society and sport, to what extent is the Brazil FIFA World Cup meeting its social, economic and political objectives?

1pm to 2pm

Lunch

2.00pm to 3.15pm

Speaker and Panel Discussion

The reform of sport governing bodies

Chair: Dr Geoff Walters
Director of the Sport Business Centre and Senior Lecturer in Sport Management, Birkbeck

Speaker: Professor Jean-Loup Chappelet
Professor of Public Management, Swiss School of Public Administration, (IDHEAP), University of Lausanne

In the morning sessions a large part of the focus will have been on the alleged governance shortcomings of the two lead sport governing bodies, FIFA and the IOC. In this session the speakers specifically address how sport governing bodies may go about reforming themselves by setting new governance standards.

In this keynote speech Jean-Loup Chappelet, a leading expert on the governance of international sport governing bodies and of the IOC in particular, presents proposals for setting international standards in sport governance – the BIBGIS (Basic Indicators for Better Governance in International Sport).

Following on from Jean-Loup Chappelet's presentation the panel will address the resulting pertinent questions:

Joy Johnston Governance Manager UK Sport

What is UK Sport, the lead body in Britain for the development of elite performance sport, proposing to promote good governance in UK sport governing bodies?

Professor Barrie Houlihan Professor of Sport Policy, Loughborough University

Sean Hamil Director of the Sport Business Centre and Lecturer in Sport Management, Birkbeck

3.30pm to 5pm

Speaker and Panel Discussion

How cities use major sporting events and build a lasting legacy

Chair: Sean Hamil
Director of the Sport Business Centre and Lecturer in Sport Management, Birkbeck

Speaker: Debbie Jevans CBE
CEO England World Cup 2015

Every country/city that bids for a sport mega event claims there will be a significant economic legacy. Does the evidence support this contention?

In her presentation Debbie Jevans outlines: (1) why England bid for the Rugby World Cup 2015; (2) the specific legacy case made in all its facets; (3) why she believes the tournament will deliver the legacy?; (4) what the England bid learned from the London 2012 Olympic Games experience.

Following on from Debbie Jevan’s presentation the panel will address the following questions:

Dennis Hone (CBE) CEO London Legacy Development Corporation

What has been the legacy of London 2012 been for London?

Yawar Abbas Head of Major Events, Manchester City Council

What has been the long-term legacy of the 2002 Manchester Commonwealth Games? To what extent has the emergence of Manchester City as a major footballing power been facilitated by its move from its old Maine Road stadium to the Commonwealth Games stadium?

Professor Holger Preuss Professor of Sport Economics and Sport Sociology at the Johannes Gutenberg-University in Mainz, Germany

What is the historic record, in economic impact terms, of sport mega events?

Iain Edmondson Head of Major Events at London & Partners

Does the success of London 2012 demonstrate that the operational management of sport mega events has become more manageable? If so, what are the key factors for success?

Professor Simon Shibli Head of Sport Industry Research Centre, Sheffield Hallam University

Dr Larissa Davies Reader is Sport Management, Sheffield Hallam University

What is the wider impact of sport mega events?

5pm to 6.30pm

Reception in the Clore Management Centre

6.30pm to 7.15pm

Introduction by The Master, Professor David Latchman, Birkbeck

Lord Marshall Memorial Lecture

David Bernstein CBE: From Club to Country: a twenty-year journey in football

David BernsteinDavid Bernstein CBE is the chairman of the British Red Cross, and has enjoyed a long and successful career both in the accountancy profession and in business. He continues as Chairman of Ted Baker PLC.

However, twenty years ago he embarked on a parallel journey in the world of football when he joined the board of Manchester City FC, the club he had supported as a boy. He found a club in profound crisis and subsequently took up the role of club Chairman from 1998 to 2003 before resigning on matters of principle. His tenure saw stability return to the club’s management and a revival in its playing fortunes. He was also closely associated with the successful move, in 2003, by the club from its old Maine Road stadium to the City of Manchester stadium constructed for the 2002 Commonwealth Games.

In 2003 David became a Director of Wembley Stadium Ltd, and was appointed Chairman of the board from 2008 to 2011. In 2014 Wembley is regarded as Europe’s premier sport stadium, having hosted two UEFA Champions League finals in 2011 and 2013.

From 2011 to 2013 David was the Chairman of the Football Association (FA). Again he joined the board of an organisation that was widely perceived to be in some disarray, following a very difficult year in which there were key board resignations and major disappointments with the performance of the England team in the 2010 FIFA World Cup and the 2018 World Cup bid.

When he stood down from the Chairmanship, having reaching the statutory age of retirement for an FA Chairman, he once again left an organisation where both operational stability and strategic focus had been restored, and where a governance reform process was showing some results, notably with the appointment of two independent non-executive directors to the FA Board.

In this presentation, David reflects on his twenty year parallel journey through football, from club, to mega-stadium management, to governing body. In particular he will discuss the challenges faced by directors and chairs of football organisations who wish to pursue a progressive agenda based on sound financial management principles and good governance practice in the highly unstable world of sport business, sport politics, and sport governance.



7.15pm to 8.30pm

Closing Refreshments and Networking

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