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Colette Wilson, Honorary Research Fellow

Colette Wilson’s research interests lie in (1) French literature and the visual arts of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and (2) the relationship between text and image, particularly photobooks. Her research is informed by theories of cultural and transcultural memory and situated within a historical and political framework. Her recent publications include articles on the photographic representation of Alexandria (International Journal of Francophone Studies 2012) and auto-fictional texts by Jacques Hassoun (Journal of Romance Studies 2013). She is the author of the monograph Paris and the Commune 1871-78: the politics of forgetting (MUP 2007, paperback 2016). In 2008 she curated the exhibition Photography and Cultural Memory. Four Contemporary Photographers: Daniel Boetker-Smith, John Nassari, Matthew Pontin and Stephen Smith (ISBN 978-1-902671-58-1 2008).

From 2008-11 with Patrizia di Bello and Shamoon Zamir she helped organise a series of workshops and international conference as part of the AHRC-funded project on ‘The Photobook’, and subsequently co-edited the volume The Photobook from Talbot to Ruscha and Beyond (IB Tauris 2011). This project was followed by a further AHRC award for the project ‘Ottoman Cities Past and Present’ with Jay Prosser, Gabriel Koureas, and Leslie Hakim-Dowek. See details of this at: https://ottomancosmopolitanism.wordpress.com/. Publication of a special co-edited volume of Memory Studies journal is planned for 2019. Following the success of this project, Colette co-organised the conference ‘Mediterranean Transcultural memories: Visualising Mediterranean Port Cities, 1850 to the present’ with Gabriel Koureas and Katia Pizzi. Selected papers from the conference are being co-edited for publication in the Journal of Transcultural Memory (2019). Colette is currently researching French representations of Ottoman Turkey in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and writing articles on photobooks by the Swiss-French photographer Frédéric Boissonnas and his son Edmond-Edouard Boissonnas (forthcoming 2019).