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Analysing Data

Overview

  • Credit value: 15 credits at Level 5
  • Convenor: to be confirmed
  • Assessment: coursework (20%), statistical reports (20%) and a written examination (60%)

Module description

This module provides an introduction to the foundations of statistical inference including hypothesis testing, constructing confidence intervals and non-parametric methods. For students planning to specialise more on the statistical aspects of data science, it provides the essential foundations for further study in this area. Numerous examples will be provided, many of which will explored with the aid of an appropriate statistical programming language and package.

Indicative module syllabus

  • Estimation, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing with special reference to samples from normal distributions and estimates of proportions
  • Chi-square tests of goodness of fit
  • Goodness of fit for the Poisson distribution
  • Two-way contingency tables
  • Non-parametric methods
  • Hypothesis tests in R

Learning objectives

By the end of this module, you will be able to:

  • carry out goodness of fit tests for the Poisson distribution
  • find estimates and construct confidence intervals for unknown parameter values (i) by the use of statistical tables or (ii) by the use of a statistical package, especially for data from normal distributions and for proportions
  • formulate statistical hypotheses, compute appropriate test statistics, evaluate their significance, (i) by the use of statistical tables or (ii) by the use of a statistical package, and draw conclusions, especially for data from normal distributions and for proportions
  • carry out chi-square tests for data from contingency tables (i) by the use of statistical tables or (ii) by the use of a statistical package, and draw conclusions
  • carry out non-parametric hypothesis tests, in particular the sign test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test
  • report clearly and simply the results of statistical analyses in a way that may be understood by non-specialists
  • edit the output from a statistical computer package and incorporate extracts into a word-processed report.