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Transport and nature

Birkbeck Free Lecture Series, Autumn 2018, Birkbeck, University of London

Six Friday evenings at 18:30, October 12th to November 16th inclusive. Venues for the lectures vary and are available only for October. Enquire at the Birkbeck main building for November venues.

Our transport, and transport “infrastructure”, affect wildlife in many ways. The verges of roads, farm tracks, waterways, railways, and abandoned railways provide corridors of wildlife habitat. These support wildlife and may also help species to move through an otherwise inhospitable environment. There have been many schemes to enhance verges, but the need to manage efficient and safe routes for people can also lead to the degradation or removal of habitat. Transport routes can also act as barriers to the movement of animals and lead to the loss of habitat. Road (and rail) kill can harm animal populations. Emissions from transport are significant sources of air and water pollution, including contributions to acid rain and eutrophication as well as direct effects on plant and animal health. This lecture series examines both sides of the coin.

12th October ‘A walk along the tracks: the story of the Parkland Walk - an abandoned railway line, now London’s longest Local Nature Reserve.’ David Bevan.

Lecture theatre B33, Birkbeck main building Torrington Square.

19th October ‘Do corridors along transport links work for wildlife.’ Dave Dawson.

Lecture theatre B01, Clore Building, Torrington Square (diagonally opposite the Birkbeck main building).

26th October ‘Lessons from the Green Transport Corridors Project.’ Nick White, Senior Advisor, Biodiversity 2020 Programme Team, Biodiversity Delivery, Natural England.

Lecture theatre B04, 43 Gordon Square.

2nd November ‘Amphibians, reptiles and British roads. The good, the bad and the future.’ Silviu Petrovan, Conservation Science Group, “Conservation Evidence”. Dept. Zoology, University of Cambridge.

9th November ‘Trees and highways: street tree management in London’. John Parker, Transport for London, Senior Arboriculture & Landscape Specialist.

16th November ‘Biodiversity at Gatwick Airport’. Rachel Bicker, biodiversity consultant.

Further details, and venues, will be posted at http://www.bbk.ac.uk/geography/our-research/ecss/free-public-lectures or email: ecssoc@gmail.com.

A reading list for this series can be downloaded here.