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2nd Intimate Citizenship Colloquium in association with FEMCIT

INTIMATE CITIZENSHIP: CROSS-NATIONAL PERSPECTIVES ON CHANGING POLICIES AND PRACTICES  -Thursday 12 November 2009,  36 Gordon Square, Upper Meeting Room (Birkbeck buzzer)
Researchers and PhD students who are working on issues of intimacy, personal life, gender and sexuality, and how they relate to processes of socio-historical change, and to law and policy, are invited to this Roundtable Colloquium. Participants are limited to 25 to ensure there is time and space for discussion, and participants are invited to prepare a 5 minute presentation about their own work-in-progress for the final "Open Mic" session (if you wish to do this, please email Sasha Roseneil in advance - s.roseneil@bbk.ac.uk).

Programme

11.00-11.15        Welcome and Introductions

11.15-12.15         Keynote Speaker: Dr Mary Holmes (Flinders University)

                           "Intimacy, distance relationships, and emotional care in transnational context"

12.15-1.00           PhD Presentation: Catrine Andersson (Uppsala University)
                            "Marriage likeness to coupledom:shifting regulations of intimate relationships in
                            Swedish marriage law"

1.00-2.00             Lunch

2.00-2.45             PhD Presentation: Anneli Gustafsson (Stockholm University)
                            "Confessions of love and intimacy: the same-sex marriage debate in the
                            Swedish Parliament”

2.45-3.45             FEMCIT Paper: Sasha Roseneil, Isabel Crowhurst, Tone Hellesund, Ana Cristina Santos & Mariya Stoilova (Birkbeck & University of Bergen).
                            “The changing landscape of heteronormativity: the regulation of same-sex sexualities in Europe”.                 
                       
3.45-4.00             Tea

4.00-5.00             "Open Mic": participants' presentations of work-in-progress

5.00                     Close

Mary Holmes is a Senior Lecturer at Flinders University in Australia. Currently she is Visiting Scholar in Women's Studies at the University of York in the UK. She has published on distance relationships in a number of journals including The Sociological Review and Sociological Research Online. She is author of The Representation of Feminists as Political Actors (VDM 2008) and of What is Gender? (Sage 2007).

Catrine Andersson is a PhD candidate in sociology at The Institute for Housing and Urban Research, Uppsala University, Sweden. The subject of her thesis is changes in Swedish state discourse on marriage, specifically white papers on marriage law, from 1909 to 2009.

Anneli Gustafsson is a PhD candidate in the Department of Political Science, Stockholm University. Her PhD project is entitled ‘Bodybuilding in Politics: Constructing Body and Built Environment in the Swedish Parliament’. During 2008/09 she worked in the Swedish Parliament as the grant holder of the Swedish Parliament scholarship. She also has a background in theatre and acting.

Sasha Roseneil, Isabel Crowhurst, Tone Hellesund, Ana Cristina Santos and Mariya Stoilova are the “Intimate Citizenship” research team within the EU-funded FP6 Project FEMCIT – Gendered Citizenship in Multicultural Europe. Sasha is the Director of the Birkbeck Institute for Social Research, and is Professor of Sociology and Social Theory at Birkbeck. Isabel, Cristina and Mariya are Research Fellows based in the Birkeck Institute for Social Research, working on FEMCIT. Tone is Senior Researcher in the Rokkan Centre at the University of Bergen.


WINTER COLLOQUIUM  -  Beyond the Pink Curtain? Eastern European Sexualities, Homophobia and Western Eyes

Friday 22nd  January 2010   Room 541  Birkbeck College Main Building   10 – 5pm + Film screening - Thursday 21st  January 2010

Invitation to Participate

Sexualities, as aspects of identity and as part of the public language of nation, are a controversial feature of post-communist transition in Central and Eastern Europe. Radical political changes have led to the emergence of new social actors, such as the LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) movement, the airing of new discourses about sexuality, as well as the eruption of new social conflicts and divisions.

This interdisciplinary Colloquium will  bring together scholars in the social sciences, history, Slavic and other area studies, as well as activists from LGBT communities, to examine the relationships between gender, nation and sexuality. How, for example, did the emergence of revised national identities after 1989 relate to new conceptions of non-normative gender and sexuality? What were the local dimensions of the ‘lesbian and gay question’, and why did they develop? How did queer sexualities in this region evolve historically? And what influence does that historical legacy have today? What are the specificities and particularities of Central and Eastern European sexual identities, within the region and compared with Western and other non-Western formations?

There will be a screening of the film “Beyond the Pink Curtain” (2009) and a discussion with Director Matthew Charles at 3pm on Thursday 21st  January in the Birkbeck Cinema, 43 Gordon Square.

Cost, includes vegetarian lunch:  £25 standard  £10 Birkbeck staff and all students.


2nd Intimate Citizenship Colloquium in association with FEMCIT

INTIMATE CITIZENSHIP: CROSS-NATIONAL PERSPECTIVES ON CHANGING POLICIES AND PRACTICES

Thursday 12 November 2009,  36 Gordon Square, Upper Meeting Room (Birkbeck buzzer)

Researchers and PhD students who are working on issues of intimacy, personal life, gender and sexuality, and how they relate to processes of socio-historical change, and to law and policy, are invited to this Roundtable Colloquium. Participants are limited to 25 to ensure there is time and space for discussion, and participants are invited to prepare a 5 minute presentation about their own work-in-progress for the final "Open Mic" session (if you wish to do this, please email Sasha Roseneil in advance - s.roseneil@bbk.ac.uk).

Programme

11.00-11.15        Welcome and Introductions

11.15-12.15         Keynote Speaker: Dr Mary Holmes (Flinders University)

                           "Intimacy, distance relationships, and emotional care in transnational context"

12.15-1.00           PhD Presentation: Catrine Andersson (Uppsala University)
                            "Marriage likeness to coupledom:shifting regulations of intimate relationships in
                            Swedish marriage law"

1.00-2.00             Lunch

2.00-2.45             PhD Presentation: Anneli Gustafsson (Stockholm University)
                            "Confessions of love and intimacy: the same-sex marriage debate in the
                            Swedish Parliament”

2.45-3.45             FEMCIT Paper: Sasha Roseneil, Isabel Crowhurst, Tone Hellesund, Ana Cristina Santos & Mariya                                    Stoilova (Birkbeck & University of Bergen).
                            “The changing landscape of heteronormativity: the regulation of same-sex sexualities in Europe”.                 
                       
3.45-4.00             Tea

4.00-5.00             "Open Mic": participants' presentations of work-in-progress

5.00                     Close

There will be a nominal charge of £10 for researchers and £5 for PhD students, payable on the day, to cover lunch and refreshments.

Biographical Notes on Speakers

Mary Holmes is a Senior Lecturer at Flinders University in Australia. Currently she is Visiting Scholar in Women's Studies at the University of York in the UK. She has published on distance relationships in a number of journals including The Sociological Review and Sociological Research Online. She is author of The Representation of Feminists as Political Actors (VDM 2008) and of What is Gender? (Sage 2007).

Catrine Andersson is a PhD candidate in sociology at The Institute for Housing and Urban Research, Uppsala University, Sweden. The subject of her thesis is changes in Swedish state discourse on marriage, specifically white papers on marriage law, from 1909 to 2009.

Anneli Gustafsson is a PhD candidate in the Department of Political Science, Stockholm University. Her PhD project is entitled ‘Bodybuilding in Politics: Constructing Body and Built Environment in the Swedish Parliament’. During 2008/09 she worked in the Swedish Parliament as the grant holder of the Swedish Parliament scholarship. She also has a background in theatre and acting.

Sasha Roseneil, Isabel Crowhurst, Tone Hellesund, Ana Cristina Santos and Mariya Stoilova are the “Intimate Citizenship” research team within the EU-funded FP6 Project FEMCIT – Gendered Citizenship in Multicultural Europe. Sasha is the Director of the Birkbeck Institute for Social Research, and is Professor of Sociology and Social Theory at Birkbeck. Isabel, Cristina and Mariya are Research Fellows based in the Birkeck Institute for Social Research, working on FEMCIT. Tone is Senior Researcher in the Rokkan Centre at the University of Bergen.

For more information about FEMCIT, visit our website: http://www.femcit.org/

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/bisr/research/FEMCIT

For more information about the Intimate Citizenship research grouping at Birkbeck, visit:  http://www.bbk.ac.uk/bisr/research/intimate


July 2009 - Summer Colloquium
Tactical Play: Playful enquiry as a tactic for change in socially engaged art and the social sciences

Informed by discourses of cross-pollination between social science and art, this colloquium will discuss the role of “play” as a tactic for social change within reflexive and performative social science methods and socially engaged art processes. Positioning playful enquiry as both a method and meeting place between the disciplines, the event will seek to address the following questions through the presentation of case studies and open discussion:

In what way do the essential characteristics of one discipline offer possibilities for “play” within the other?
How is research through performance, fiction, collaboration and conversation employed by each discipline and what are the individual motivations for this.
At what point does playful enquiry meet “hard edged” research, and what are the academic implications.
In what way is “play” a politicised method, and how can members of each profession use it to antagonise the frameworks in which they operate?
Speakers:  Anne Douglas (Gray’s School of Art, Aberdeen),  Justin McKeown (artist), Christian Nold (artist), Lynn Froggett (University of Central Lancashire)


February 2009  -  Spring Colloquium
'Conflict and Collaboration: Women's Liberation Movements in Historical and Comparative Perspective'

This colloquium seeks to document and analyse the Women's Liberation Movements (WLMs) of the 1970s. Women's Liberation created new networks for political and personal collaboration that aimed at redressing disparities in women's pay, social status and professional opportunity, and sought to transform personal life and intimate relationships. Pioneering feminist theory emanating from WLMs brought issues of sexuality, reproduction, the family, race, and violence to the attention of women and men in dozens of countries. By the 1980s, though, WLMs had fragmented, and noticeable factions within feminism replaced its earlier unity and sense of purpose. This colloquium will feature discussions of the significance and impact of WLMs in England, Norway, Scotland, and the United States. Topics for discussion will range from the empirical to the historiographical, and may include but not be limited to the following:

• How have historians and sociologists approached the task of documenting Women's Liberation?• What are the unique questions and concerns of each national movement?• What are the features of the relationship between historians, sociologists and WLM activists? How can oral histories with feminists active in the 1970s assist our understanding of politics in the 1970s and 1980s?• Which 'voices' from Women's Liberation are most often heard, and which are the least often featured/remembered in WLM histories?• How can we assess the impact of Women's Liberation on popular and official attitudes about the roles of women?

Speakers:  Sarah F. Browne (University of Dundee), Sue Bruley (University of Portsmouth), Rachel Cohen (The Women’s Library/ Westminster University), Hilde Danielsen (University of Begen, Anna Davin  (History Workshop Journal), Synnøve Lindtner (University of Bergen), Line Nyhagen Predelli (Loughborough University), Jeska Rees (Birkbeck, University of London), Sasha Roseneil (Birkbeck, University of London)


October 2008 - Autumn Colloquium
Moving Citizens: exploring worlds of emotional politics

In the early years of the 21st century we are living in an increasingly mobile and hyper-connected world, but the emotional politics and intimate impacts of mobility and connectivity are relatively unacknowledged in the social sciences. This Colloquium will explore the global and local circulation and mobilization of emotion and affect amongst citizens, the ways in which the movement of people around the world is experienced emotionally, and the politics of these processes. It is organized in conjunction with the Intimate Citizenship strand of the EU-funded FEMCIT project http://www.bbk.ac.uk/bisr/research/FEMCIT

Participants are invited from a wide variety of academic disciplines, as well as practitioners in the fields of psychotherapy, counselling and human rights and other NGOs.

Papers:

“Affective Citizenship: from Blair to Obama”      

Carol Johnson (University of Adelaide)

“Switching Off? Emotional Reactions to Media Reports of Human Rights Abuses”

Bruna Seu (Birkbeck)

“Proximity, Unease and the Moral Politics of Intimate Citizenship”

Anne-Marie Fortier (Lancaster University)

“Living Intimate Citizenship: migration, movement, and emotional worlds”

Sasha Roseneil (Birkbeck)

“Hosts and Migrants: Vicissitudes of Loss and Resentment” 

Paul Hoggett (University of the West of England)

Speakers: Anne-Marie Fortier is Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Director, Centre for Gender and Women’s Studies, Lancaster University.She is the author of Multicultural Horizons (Routledge 2008) and Migrant Belongings (Berg 2000), and co-editor of Uprootings/Regroundings (Berg 2003). She has also co-edited thematic issues of journals such as: issue on ‘Re-Imagining Communities’ for the International Journal of Cultural Studies 6(3) 2003, and on ‘European Migrant Horizons’ (w. Gail Lewis) for Mobilities 1(3) 2006. She has published in numerous journals, including: Theory, Culture and Society; Ethnic and Racial Studies; Diaspora; European Journal of Cultural Studies.

Paul Hoggett is Professor of Politics and Director of the Centre for Psycho-Social Studies, University of the West of England.

Carol Johnson is Professor of Politics, University of Adelaide, and Honorary Visiting Fellow, Birkbeck Institute for Social Research (2008).

Sasha Roseneil is Professor of Sociology and Social Theory, Birkbeck and Director, Birkbeck Institute for Social Research.

Bruna Seu is a psychoanalytic psychotherapist and Lecturer in Psychosocial Studies, Birkbeck.