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Dr Andrew Milner

Emeritus Reader in Vertebrate Palaeontology

Contact details

tel: 020 7631 0781
fax: 020 7631 6246
email: a.milner@bbk.ac.uk

Research address: Department of Palaeontology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD
tel: 020 7942 5435
email: andrew.milner@nhm.ac.uk

About Dr Andrew Milner

Research interests

  • Dr Milner's principal research programmes are concerned with the structure, biogeography and evolution of amphibians, ancient and modern.

    Morphology and palaeobiology of early amphibians

    Research focuses on the earliest land vertebrates, especially amphibians of the Order Temnospondyli, which are distant ancestors and relatives of the modern frogs and salamanders. Dr Milner has published his investigations on their morphology, evolution, biogeography, palaeobiology and the circumstances of their death and preservation.

    Origin and early evolution of the modern amphibian groups

    The origin and early diversification of the modern amphibian groups has been an intractable problem for biologists because of an apparently poor fossil record. Dr Milner's research has made several theoretical and synthetic contributions to the solution of this problem, and working with Dr S.E. Evans (U.C.L. Anatomy) this research has described mid-Mesozoic frogs, salamanders and caecilians from Oxfordshire, Dorset, Wyoming, Spain, and the Sudan. This work has also led to involvement in the 'Global Change Project' run by the Natural History Museum, London, and Department of Geological Sciences, University College, London on biotic turnover over the last 150 million years.

Recent publications

  • Journal articles

    Milner, A. R. and Sequiera, S.E.K. (2003). On a small Cochleosaurus described as a large Limnogyrinus (Amphibia,Temnospondyli) from the Upper Carboniferous of the Czech Republic. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 48: 51-55.

    Milner, A. R. and Sequiera, S.E.K. (2003). Revision of the amphibian genus Limnerpeton (Temnospondyli) from the Upper Carboniferous of the Czech Republic. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 48: 31-50.

    Book chapters

    Milner, A.R. (1994) Chapter 1. Late Triassic and Jurassic amphibians: fossil record and phylogeny. In: In the Shadow of the Dinosaurs: Early Mesozoic Tetrapods. Eds. N.C. Fraser and H.-D. Sues. 5-22. Cambridge University Press. 435 pp.

    Milner, A.R. (1996) A revision of the temnospondyl amphibians from the Upper Carboniferous of Joggins, Nova Scotia. 81-103. In Studies on Carboniferous and Permian vertebrates. Ed. A.R. Milner. Special Papers in Palaeontology, 52, 1-148.

    Milner, A.R. (1996) A revision of the temnospondyl amphibians from the Upper Carboniferous of Joggins, Nova Scotia. 81-103. In Studies on Carboniferous and Permian vertebrates. Ed. A.R. Milner. Special Papers in Palaeontology, 52, 1-148.

    Milner, A.R. (1993) Chapter 38. Amphibian-grade Tetrapoda. In The Fossil Record 2. Ed. M.J. Benton. 663-677. Palaeontological Association / Chapman and Hall. 845 pp.

    Milner, A.R. (1993) Chapter 13: Biogeography of Palaeozoic tetrapods. In Palaeozoic Vertebrate Biostratigraphy and Biogeography. Ed. J.A. Long. 324-353. Belhaven Press, London.

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