Tracing the Twentieth Century through Maps

europe_from_space_640The 20th century was a period of extremes, of contrasts and contradictions. It witnessed destructive wars, and yet periods of unprecedented peace. Increasing wealth was joined by higher levels of poverty. There was scientific and technological progress, but also inhumanity and repression. The map was one of the century’s principal objects. Thanks to developments in geography education, cheaper and quicker mapmaking processes, and increasing travel and migration, maps became common, trusted and powerful things in western society. Yet maps were not passive or neutral objects. They were agents of change, presenting only versions of reality, not the reality itself. They were capable of informing, but also misleading. They were tools of control and of protest, and even changed the world.

With these advances and the changing role of maps in mind, on Monday 5th December Dr Jessica Reinisch will deliver a keynote lecture addressing ‘What Matters Most about the Twentieth Century?’ as part of a one day CPD course for secondary school teachers. The course, ‘Tracing the Twentieth Century through Maps‘, is hosted by the Historical Association in partnership with the British Library and is designed to aid those teaching 20th century units at GCSE or A-Level, with the day based around the British Library’s forthcoming exhibition Maps and the 20th Century: Drawing the Line.

The course will comprise of keynotes from Jessica Reinisch and Tom Harper, lead curator of the exhibition, followed by a series of workshops to develop subject knowledge and support best practice teaching. These workshops will feature Ben Walsh, associate vice president of the Historical Association, on the Cold War and Alf Wilkinson, educational consultant and textbook author, on the First World War.

Booking is open now through Eventbrite here. Further information and the full programme for the day is available to consult on the Historical Association’s website here.

Writing ‘Outsiders’ into the History of International Public Health: A Working Symposium

League of NationsHistories of the development of international public health in the twentieth century tend to be celebrations of achievements – whether the enrolling of an ever-widening number of nations in programs to improve health and prevent disease, the adoption of shared standards and measurements to track health status, or the circulation of health researchers and statesmen across national frontiers. Justified though it often was, the repeated sounding of trumpets may have relegated to the background “outsiders” in the international health arena.

What impact, we wonder, would factoring in “outsiders” make to the way we write the history of international public health? What can close study of “outsiders” tell us about the international system of public health – its rules (written and unwritten), its reach, and its commitment to inclusiveness.

These questions will form the basis for discussion in a working symposium on ‘Writing “Outsiders” into the History of International Public Health.’ The workshop will be held on Thursday 27th and Friday 28th October at Birkbeck, University of London.

The workshop is free and open to all. A limited number of spaces are available for both days of the workshop. To book a place, please email reluctant.internationalists@gmail.com. Full details of the workshop programme are outlined below.

THURSDAY, 27 OCTOBER

Introductions 09.30 – 10.00am

Panel 1: Giving and Taking 10.00 – 11.30am

ŸJessica Reinisch, The ‘haves’ and ‘have nots’: the political geography of UNRRA’s donating and receiving countries

Lion Murard, Ironies of Technical Assistance: Greece, Eastern Europe and Health Internationalism in the interwar period

Davide Rodogno & Thomas David, Fellows and Fellowships in Public Health: an overview and a focus on the case of China

 

Panel 2: Neither Centre nor Periphery: Soviet Russia in the inter-war years 12.00 – 1.30pm

Susan Gross Solomon, Making the case: the USSR in Geneva and New York

Johanna Conterio, Socialist Design around the Black Sea

Sarah Marks, Czechoslovakia as insider and outsider in early Cold War era

 

Panel 3: Public Health in ‘Outsider’ States 2.30 – 4.00pm

ŸDavid Brydan, Franco Spain as outsider and insider

ŸPaul Weindling, Germany as an outsider in international health under Nazism

ŸMaria Zarifi, Public health and the construction of Greece

 

FRIDAY, 28 OCTOBER

Panel 4: Inclusion and Exclusion in International Health Networks 10.30am – 12.00pm

ŸJessica Pearson-Patel, Colonial Politics of Global Public Health

ŸDora Vargha, Insiders and outsiders in the WHO

ŸAna Antic, Communist medicine and psychiatry and its links to the global South

 

Final Roundtable: Internationalism and Public Health 12.00 – 1.30pm

What difference does adding outsiders make to the way we write the history of public health? How does it change the writing of international history?

ŸPatricia Clavin

ŸPeter Jackson

ŸPaul Weindling

ŸPatrick Zylberman