Climate Change Management (MSc)

Programme status: Fully Approved

The MSc Climate Change Management aims to meet the needs of both climate-change practitioners and those hoping to move into this fast-developing sector. The programme will provide students with a comprehensive advanced level grounding in many areas of climate change and an opportunity to reflect on practice at both individual and corporate levels. As the programme is offered through part-time, evening, face-to-face study, it provides a distinctive opportunity for practitioners to combine study with a continuing career.

In the compulsory programme, you will gain an informed understanding of the key issues in the 3 main areas of science, policy and business, by engaging with academic, professional and popular literature. You will be able to critically evaluate scientific scenarios for future climates and landscape impacts, assess the effectiveness of different policy approaches, and determine suitable business responses to the climate change challenge. You will then be able to pursue your own interests, both within climate change and across the broad range of Master's-level environment modules. The research project will comprise in-depth study of real challenges arising from climate change, in a number of contexts.

It is also possible to specialise in Geographic Information Science (GIS) and gain an MSC Climate Change Management with GIS.

From October 2013-14, (pending approval) completion of the correct option modules within this MSc will allow students to become Associate Members with the Institute of Environmental Management and Assessment (IEMA).

Find out more about studying at Birkbeck and what our students say about our geography- and environment-related programmes.

Watch an Introduction to Climate Change taster lecture.

Lecture: 'Climate Change and the River Thames' (delivered by Becky Briant)

The River Thames is the lifeblood of London, yet under future climate change scenarios it will be under considerable pressure. With projected changes in rainfall affecting both the water quality and quantity received in the upper reaches of the Thames and sea level rise encroaching in the lower parts, what is the future for this iconic part of London’s landscape?

Podcast and slides

Blog post