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SSHP Study Support Workshops

Get into the study habit on Saturdays during 2016 - 2017

Academic skills workshops for undergraduate students in the School of Social Sciences, History and Philosophy

Academic skills are crucial to your success in your studies. They help you to become an efficient and effective learner. These workshops will introduce you to the academic skills that are expected of you as an undergraduate student.

The workshops will be run by Sara Steinke who is an experienced teacher at Birkbeck.

Please find below information about the workshops that we are running. To book a place on the workshop click on the Eventbrite link.

 

Date: Saturday 8 October 2016 Time: 2pm-4pm Room: MAL 402, Malet St.

Time Management 2pm-3pm

Managing your time is key to being an effective and efficient student who is able to fit studying into a busy life. This workshop will enable you to assess how well you manage your time at present and to adopt time management techniques, such as prioritisation and managing your distractions.

 

Active listening and speaking skills for academic purposes 3pm-4pm

Listening to lecturers and fellow students, and expressing your point of view in public are key ingredients of being a successful student. This workshop will explore the importance of active listening and speaking skills, and identify techniques to help you with these skills.

 

Date: Saturday 15 October 2016 Time: 10am-12pm Room: GOR B01, 43 Gordon Sq.

Academic writing 10am-11am

Writing is an area that students find the most stressful. Successful academic writing involves recognising and using its established conventions. This workshop will consider the conventions and role of formal, objective, precise, explicit, cautious language and specialist vocabulary in academic writing.

 

What is meant by a good essay? 11am-12pm

Writing essays is a major way that your academic progress is judged, and is another area that students demanding. This workshop will examine the key ingredients of what makes a good academic essay, involving analysing the question, writing introductory, main body and concluding paragraphs and referencing.

 

Date: Saturday 26 November 2016 Time: 10am-1.30pm Room: MAL 252, Malet St.

Reading for academic purposes 10am-11am

Many students find the quantity and complexity of academic reading overwhelming. This workshop will consider the importance of adopting active reading strategies to help you cope with the amount of reading, to increase your understanding of the material, and how to integrate your reading into your writing.

 

Note making for academic purposes 11am-12pm

Many students encounter difficulties with note making. This workshop will identify active note making techniques to help enhance your thinking around a topic and how to integrate your notes into your writing.

 

Summarising, paraphrasing and quoting for academic purposes 12.30pm-1.30pm

Summarising, paraphrasing and quoting are vital elements of academic writing. They enable you to demonstrate your understanding of the material, and integrate it into your writing. This workshop will identify the differences between summarising, paraphrasing and quoting, and how to summarise, paraphrase and quote.

 

Date: Saturday 10 December 2016 Time: 10am- 1.30pm Room: MAL 252, Malet St.

Critical Thinking 1 – What is Critical Thinking? 10am-11am

Critical thinking is the cornerstone of studying at university and plays a key part in achieving higher grades. This workshop will consider what is meant by critical thinking, and identify the key questions with which to approach your reading and writing critically.

Critical Thinking 2 – Evaluating academic argument 11am-12pm

Evaluating academic argument is important to avoiding feedback such as ‘too descriptive, more analysis needed’. This workshop will extend the critical thinking skills covered in the Critical Thinking I workshop, and consider how complex arguments can be analysed and evaluated.

Critical Thinking 3 – Building an academic argument 12.30pm-1.30pm

Building a sound academic argument is crucial to avoiding feedback such as ‘good knowledge and understanding, but where is your argument’. This workshop will build upon the critical thinking skills covered in the Critical Thinking I and 2 workshops, and consider what is meant by a sound academic argument and how to construct a sound academic argument.

 

 

Date: Saturday 7 January 2017 Time: 10am- 1.30pm Room: MAL 253, Malet St.

Reading for academic purposes 10am-11am

Many students find the quantity and complexity of academic reading overwhelming. This workshop will consider the importance of adopting active reading strategies to help you cope with the amount of reading, to increase your understanding of the material, and how to integrate your reading into your writing.

 

Note making for academic purposes 11am-12pm

Many students encounter difficulties with note making. This workshop will identify active note making techniques to help enhance your thinking around a topic, and how to integrate your notes into your writing.

 

Summarising, paraphrasing and quoting for academic purposes 12.30pm-1.30pm

Summarising, paraphrasing and quoting are vital elements of academic writing. They enable you to

demonstrate your understanding of the material and integrate it into your writing. This workshop will identify the differences between summarising, paraphrasing and quoting, and how to summarise, paraphrase and quote.

 

Date: Saturday 14 January 2017 Time: 10am-12pm Room: MAL 253, Malet St.

Academic writing 10am-11am

Writing is an area that students find the most stressful. Successful academic writing involves recognising and using its established conventions. This workshop will identify these conventions, and the role of formal, objective, precise, explicit, cautious language and specialist vocabulary in academic writing.

 

What is meant by a good essay? 11am-12pm

Writing essays is a major way that your academic progress is judged, and is another area that students demanding. This workshop will examine the key ingredients of what makes a good academic essay, involving analysing the question, writing introductory, main body and concluding paragraphs and referencing.

 

Date: Saturday 18 February 2017 Time: 10am-1.30pm Room: MAL 252, Malet St.

Critical Thinking 1 – What is Critical Thinking? 10am-11am

Critical thinking is the cornerstone of studying at university and plays a key part in achieving higher grades. This workshop will consider what is meant by critical thinking, and identify the key questions with which to approach your reading and writing critically.

Critical Thinking 2 – Evaluating academic argument 11am-12pm

Evaluating academic argument is important to avoiding feedback such as ‘too descriptive, more analysis needed’. This workshop will extend the critical thinking skills covered in the Critical Thinking I workshop, and consider how complex arguments can be analysed and evaluated.

Critical Thinking 3 – Building an academic argument 12.30pm-1.30pm

Building a sound academic argument is crucial to avoiding feedback such as ‘good knowledge and understanding, but where is your argument’. This workshop will build upon the critical thinking skills covered in the Critical Thinking I and 2 workshops, and consider what is meant by a sound academic argument and how to construct a sound academic argument.

 

Date: Saturday 25 March 2017 Time: 10am-12pm Room: MAL 252, Malet St.

Revision 10am -11am

Effective revision techniques are crucial to a successful exam performance. This workshop will consider the common revision problems that students encounter, and identify revision techniques, including how to organise yourself for the exam period, and how to create an effective and manageable revision timetable

 

Exam 11am-12pm

Exams are a performance (rather like an athletic or a cultural performance) that require strategies (a game plan). This workshop will consider the common exam problems that students encounter, and identify strategies for writing a good essay style exam answer and managing your time in the exam.

 

 

Date: Saturday 29 April 2017 Time: 10am-12pm Location: MAL 351, Malet St.

Revision 10am -11am

Effective revision techniques are crucial to a successful exam performance. This workshop will consider the common revision problems that students encounter, and identify revision techniques, including how to organise yourself for the exam period, and how to create an effective and manageable revision timetable

 

Exam 11am-12pm

Exams are a performance (rather like an athletic or a cultural performance) that require strategies (a game plan). This workshop will consider the common exam problems that students encounter, and identify strategies for writing a good essay style exam answer and managing your time in the exam.