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NOTES TOWARDS DISILLUSION – An Event

- Colin Campbell Robinson

 

1. Introductory remarks

Inflected Form(s): dis·il·lu·sioned; dis·il·lu·sion·ing  /-'lü-zh&-ni[ng]/
Date: 1855
: to leave without illusion or naive faith and trust
 

To leave without illusion, to break down naïve faith and trust is not a negative thing. Is the state of disillusionment positive, a circumstance to be sought?

-          dis·il·lu·sion·ment  /-'lü-zh&n-m&nt/ noun

When it is spoken slowly, spelt-out, the word is almost Russian.
Disillusionment, or perhaps French during the time of Napoleon’s campaign into Russia. He became disillusioned at the gates of Moscow. The clambering snow cooled his cheeks.

dis·il·lu·sion      P   Pronunciation Key  (d s  -l  zh n)tr.v. dis·il·lu·sioned, dis·il·lu·sion·ing, dis·il·lu·sions

To free or deprive of illusion.

Yet, ultimately, it is an expression of a freedom, freedom from illusion. The wool is no longer over your eyes, you are dis-illusioned. Why does the word have negative connotations? A sadness, when it is freedom? Or is being deprived of illusion the moment when the starkness of reality becomes too much to bear?

n. 1. The act of disenchanting. 2.      The condition or fact of being disenchanted.

Without enchantment, the rest is useless. (Jorge Luis Borges)  

dis il·lu sion·ment n. dis il·lu sive (-s v, -z v) adj.

Be illusive but don’t walk far. Be dis-illusive.

disillusionment
Dis`il*lu"sion*ment, n. The act of freeing from an illusion, or the state of being freed there from.

Once again the state is free. To be disillusioned may be the ultimate in post-modern values. (sic) To be disillusioned may be the link existential resistants have been seeking. Disillusionism.

n : freeing from false belief or illusions

From false belief. Therefore the concept is aligned to truth. To be disillusioned is to be honest.

To live outside the law you have to be honest. (B. Dylan).

Freedom from illusions and we’re back at the allegory of the cave.

disillusion verb [T]
to disappoint someone by telling them the unpleasant truth about something or someone that they had a good opinion of, or respected:
I hate to/I'm sorry to disillusion you, but pregnancy is not always wonderful -
I was sick every day for six months.

disillusioned adjective
He's become a disillusioned man.
All the other teachers are thoroughly disillusioned with their colleague.

disillusionment noun [U] (ALSO disillusion)
There is increasing disillusionment with the government.

I hate to tell you the truth…He’s become clearer in his thought…They now see him for what he is…They finally understand corruption….

disillusion
/d s "lu: ( )n/ verb free from illusion or mistaken belief, esp. disappointingly.
noun disillusioned state. disillusionment noun.
·verb disabuse, disappoint, disenchant, enlighten, undeceive.

To disillusion is to disenchant and enlighten. We experience disappointment because our illusions are purely, illusions. To dis-illusion is to undeceive, take away the comfort-veils of untruth and deception often played on yourself by yourself although aided and abetted by the forces of illusion. Think media/film et al. And the cave. To disabuse. Take away abuse. To see clearly now that the rain has gone.

 

2. Exercises

1.          Write the Disillusionist’s manifesto, invent their non illusory philosophy
2.          Discover the Disillusionists
3.          Where do they meet, what are their aims
4.          How the Disillusionists become household names
5.          Scenes from the lives of the Disillusionists
6.          Who’s who in the Disillusionist’s zoo. Their antecedents
7.          Disillusionist art/film/magazine

Top four Disillusionist films

1.          Last night in the Pyrenees
2.          Barthes not by Barthes
3.          The Enlightening Shade
4.          Bend it like Christmas

Disillusionist singles

1.          Don’t tip – Maitre De
2.          Loving you is the worst thing that ever happened to me – Gladys Day
3.          The long and winding bush track – Wallaby Jim and the Christmas Beetles
4.          Bend it – Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Titch

Book of the Disillusionist Month

A Lover’s Intercourse – Jimmy Barthes, Glasgow University Press

Best first Disillusionist novel.

Alice in Drearyland – Lou Caramel

Best Disillusioned quotes

I’m disillusioned therefore I am – Remy Decarthorse
I’m a pig therefore I’m ham – Porky Plato

 

3. Script

Act One

1.
Written with white chalk on a blackboard.
Disillusion: to leave without illusion or naive faith and trust 

2.  
The following happens in silence.
Sarah Forrest packs her suitcase carefully. She answers the telephone. She converses with someone. She hangs up. She stares ahead.

3.
Sarah F. on a train with her suitcase. Two young men sit opposite her. They keep looking at her but avert their gaze when she looks back. Another young man is doing tai chi. An older man is asleep. Sarah takes a book out her backpack. The book is called Disillusionment.

4.
Written with white chalk on a blackboard. Male voice with a French accent pronouncing the word.
Dis·il·lu·sion·ment.

5.
Sarah F. dragging her suitcase along a street. The handle breaks. It is a very windy day with very few people around. She tries to carry the suitcase but it is too heavy. A man runs past snatching her back-pack. She chases after him but another man is waiting further down the avenue on a scooter ready to make a getaway. Meanwhile a woman has loaded the suitcase into an old Renault. Sarah runs back but the Renault drives away.

6.
Middle aged man in a study. Professor John Lindley, Chair of Disillusionment Studies, University of Mentone. He says;
To leave without illusion, to break down naïve faith and trust is not, on closer analysis a negative state. The French Disillusionist, Henri Lefray, put it best when he said: Sans disillusionment, non enlightenment.

7.
A repeat of scene 2. Sarah F. packing her suitcase. A radio on morning talk-back discussing disillusionment. The phone rings. She answers.
Hello.
A male voice talks for a while. She eventually interrupts him.
Sorry. No one called Saunders lives here.
Male voice. She replies.
No I’m sorry. I have to go.
She hangs up and stares ahead.
Saunders, she says.

8.
Written with white chalk on a blackboard.
The wool is no longer covering your eyes. You are disillusioned.

9.
Sarah F. sitting in a room with a glass of wine in her hand.
What a disaster.
An unseen man answers. He has a French accent.
Pour quoi?
Silent shot of young woman chasing after two men on a scooter.
I come here, lose all my belongings and…
And what?
You don’t want me here.
She looks up and throws back her drink.

10.
Henri Lefray, French philosopher of Disillusionment being interviewed on television by Sara F. He is the same man heard in the previous scene.
The process of disillusionment is what I call a shaking process. Your inner being shakes when the unwavering, steely rod of insight penetrates your very being. Suddenly you see what is on the end of your fork, as William Burroughs stated. You are eating a naked lunch.
Sarah F. responds.
So disillusionment is a visceral, almost sensual experience..
No. Not almost.  Henri replies.

11.
Sarah F. watching the interview on television in silence.

12.
Professor John Lindley.
Why does the word have negative connotations? A sadness, when it is freedom? Or is being deprived of illusion a moment when the starkness of reality becomes too much to bear?
Sarah F.
Cut.
John Lindley relaxes.
Was that OK?
Sarah F. joins him.
Fine. I think we have enough now. Thank you for all the help especially the introduction to Dr Lefray.
When are you interviewing him?
I’m meeting him tomorrow.
I’m sure you’ll find him a very charming man.
I’m sure I will.

13.
Billy staring at himself in a mirror. John Lindley comes up from behind him, touches him lightly on the shoulder.

14.
Sarah F. and Henri in a café. Henri is speaking but all is in silence. They get up and leave together.

15.
Written with white chalk on a blackboard.
The act of freeing from an illusion, or the state of being freed there from.

16.
Henri Lefray lying on his back in bed smoking. He says:
To disillusion is to disenchant and enlighten. We experience disappointment because our illusions are purely illusions. To dis-illusion is to undeceive, take away the comfort-veils of untruth and deception, tricks often played by you, yourself, although aided and abetted by the forces of illusion.
Sarah F. covers his lips with her finger.


Act Two

1.
An electronic sign flashes.
Illusion from Latin, action of mocking, from illudere to mock at, from in- + ludere to play, mock.

2.
Five young activists running through back streets pursued by riot police. They are howling and baying like donkeys. One is dressed in a donkey outfit. He turns to the police and challenges them to capture him. Two police emerge from a side alley and pounce on him. He is arrested.

3.
An electronic sign flashes.
The state or fact of being intellectually deceived or misled.

4.
Professor John Lindley delivering a lecture. Some of the activists are in the audience.
Intellectually deceived. Taken for a ride. Sorry, I was under a misapprehension. I thought you were more than you appear. You are less than I bargained.
He deceived me. It is all an illusion. Ergo, to be dis -illusioned is to be without illusion.
Activists applaud. Professor blushes.

5.
In a shared house activists are arriving back after the demonstration. Sarah F. is there with her film crew.
Where’s Billy? she asks
He got nabbed by Special Branch.
Come on, she says to her crew.
They follow reluctantly.

6.
A dance in the house. In silence. Flashing light, everyone gyrating. Sarah F, Billy, the other activists and crew are there.
The electronic sign is in one corner.
Perception of something objectively existing in such a way as to cause misinterpretation of its actual nature. Hallucination.
Professor Lindley and Henri Lefray are in deep conversation in another corner.
Sarah Bekkingham approaches Lefray and they leave together. Sarah Forrest watches.

7.
Henri Lefray lying on his back in bed smoking. He says:
We experience disappointment because our illusions are purely, illusions.
Sarah B. covers his lips with her finger.

8.
Sarah F. with microphone.
In our search for the younger proponents of the disillusionist philosophy we have contacted a radical cell of students from the University of Mentone. They are inspired by the lectures of Professor John Lindley and treat the works of Henri Lefray as if gospel. With me is Sarah Bekkingham, one of the leaders of the Young Disillusionists. Sarah, how well do you know Henri Lefray? Sorry.
Cut.

9.
Sarah F with microphone.
In our search for the younger proponents of the disillusionist philosophy we have made contact with a radical cell of students from the University of Mentone. Professor John Lindley is one of their inspirations, however it is the work of Henri Lefray that they believe reveals the profound truth of disillusionment. With me is Sarah Bekkoning, one of the leaders of the Young Disillusionists. Sarah, you know Henri Lefray intimately, I’m mean, you’ve slept with him.
Sarah Bekkingham looks askance. Sarah F. apologises.
I’m really sorry. Cut. We’ll do it again. Sorry. I don’t know what I was thinking.

10.
Sarah F. with microphone on television. All is in silence. Sarah F., Henri and Sarah B. are watching it together and laughing.

11.
Billy is being freed at the prison gate. One arm is in a sling. He shakes hands awkwardly with the warder. Outside the activists are chanting slogans. Free Billy Blew, what’s he done to you. And: Billy is our boy not your toy. They cheer as Billy approaches them. Sarah F. and her crew are filming. John Lindley sits across the road in a car. In another car Henri LeFray is taking photographs. Sitting next to him is Sarah B.

12.
Professor John Lindley delivering a lecture. Some of the activists are in the audience.
Our visions are misleading. Who’s visions are not? From deserts prophets come railing their visions against common perception. But they speak in tongues. Describing hallucinations like a drug induced failure to comprehend.
To dis - illusion is to cause the subject to interpret actual nature as if nature actually existed. Let us reverse perception. When the doors of perception are cleansed.
Activists applaud. Professor blushes.

13.
Billy roughly pushed into a cell. The warder slams the gate shut and says.
Ye soft illusions, dear deceits, arise!
The warder laughs.

14.
A dance in the house. In silence. Flashing light, everyone gyrating. Sarah F., Billy, the other activists and crew are there.
An electronic sign flashes.
Illusion: deception by creating illusory ideas.
Professor Lindlay and Henri Lefray are in deep conversation in a corner. Billy, with his arm in a sling is in another.
Sarah F. approaches Lefray and they leave together. Sarah B. watches and follows. Professor Lindley goes over to Billy and puts his arm around him.

15.
Billy is being pushed around by a group of warders. He is dressed in the donkey suit. They are taunting him.
- I hate to/I'm sorry to disillusion you, but sex is not always wonderful - I was sick every day for six months.
- He's becoming a disillusioned donkey.
- We’re all thoroughly disillusioned with you.
- There is increasing disillusionment with the disillusionists.
Sarah yells : Cut. That will do now.
One of the warders says. We were just getting warmed up weren’t we Billy.
Billy lies still on the ground unable to answer.

16.
Henri Lefray lying on his back in bed smoking. All is in silence.
Sarah F. and Sarah B. cover his lips with their fingers.

 

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