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Selected publications

  • Cook, R., Brewer, R., Shah, P., & Bird, G. (2013). Alexithymia, not autism, predicts poor recognition of emotional facial expressions. Psychological Science, 24, 723-732.
  • Bird, G. & Cook, R. (2013). Mixed emotions: The contribution of alexithymia to the emotional symptoms of autism. Translational Psychiatry, 3, e285.
  • Shah, P., Gaule, A., Bird, G., & Cook, R. (2013). Robust orienting to protofacial stimuli in autism. Current Biology, 23, R1087-R1088.
  • Cook, R., Bird, G., Catmur, C., Press, C., & Heyes, C. (2014). Mirror neurons: From origin to function. Brain and Behavioral Sciences, 37, 177-192.
  • Shah, P., Gaule, A., Gaigg, S., Bird, G., & Cook, R. (2015). Probing short-term face memory in developmental prosopagnosia. Cortex, 64, 115-122.
  • Press, C. & Cook, R. (2015). Beyond simulation: domain-general motor contributions to perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 19, 176-178.
  • Murphy, J., Ipser, A., Gaigg, S. & Cook, R. (2015). Exemplar variance supports robust learning of facial identity. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 41, 577-581.
  • Ipser, A., & Cook, R. (2016). Inducing a concurrent motor load reduces perceptual sensitivity for facial expressions. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 42, 706–718.
  • Biotti, F. & Cook, R. (2016). Impaired perception of facial emotion in developmental prosopagnosia. Cortex, 81, 126-136.
  • Murphy, J., Gray, K.L.H, & Cook, R. (2017). The composite face illusion. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, 24, 245-261.
  • Biotti, F., Gray, K.L.H, Cook, R. (2017). Impaired body perception in developmental prosopagnosia. Cortex, 93, 41-49.
  • Biotti, F., Wu, E., Yang, H., Jiahui, G., Duchaine, B., & Cook, R. (2017). Normal composite face effects in developmental prosopagnosia. Cortex, 95, 63-76.
  • Murphy, J. & Cook, R. (2017). Revealing the mechanisms of human face perception using dynamic apertures. Cognition, 169, 25-35.
  • Over, H. & Cook, R. (2018). Where do spontaneous first impressions of faces come from? Cognition, 170, 190-200.

Dr Richard Cook