Skip to main content

Birkbeck in the media

The latest media coverage of Birkbeck's academics, students and initiatives: 

 NOVEMBER 2019 

October 2019

  • The 'risk to democracy' in Chile isn't from protesters. It's from Piñera and the 1% (the Guardian): Professor Oscar Guardiola-Rivera comments on the recent history of protests in the country and how Sebastián Piñera's government and the new economic model has led to widespread protests from Chile's working-class and precariat. 
  • The fallout from the US troop withdrawal from Northern Syria (BBC News - broadcast only): Dr Ashok Kumar comments on the political situation between Turkey and Kurdish forces in Syria and the USA's response to the conflict.  
  • Diplomatic immunity dispute (the Sydney Morning Herald): Professor Robert Singh comments on the tragic fatal crash involving the US Diplomat's wife, Anne Sacoolas , and 19-year-old Harry Dunn, saying he cannot recall a more serious immunity dispute between the two countries.
  • Getting serious on lifelong learning (the House magazine - print only): Robert Halfon MP praises Birkbeck as a 'bastion of social justice which provides flexible learning for those who need it most.'
  • Jews, Money, Myth (Museums' Association): An exhibition at the Jewish Museum London, developed in partnership with the Pears Institute for Anti-Semitism at Birkbeck, has won the 2019 Museums Change Lives award. 
  • The truth about screen time (the Times of India): Dr Tim Smith comments on concerns around screen time, and the links between screen use and disrupted sleep.

September 2019

AUGUST 2019 

July 2019

June 2019

May 2019

  • The beginnings of cinema (BBC Radio London): Professor Ian Christie discusses one of the pioneers of modern cinema, Robert Paul.
  • Why touching art is so tempting (CNN): Professor Fiona Candlin explains why patrons feel compelled to break the rules of museums and touch artefacts, and that this compulsion may stem from a desire to learn more about the artworks. 
  • The secret lives of Victorians (the Mirror): As Victoria returns to ITV, historical consultant for the show Dr Anne Hanley says that Victorians only pretended to be prudish but 'had a prurient fascination with all things sexual'.
  • Smartphones and sleep (the Independent, News Week): Dr Iroise Dumontheil responds to new research indicating that wearing blue-light blocking glasses may reverse the sleep problems associated with smartphones. 
  • Doctors turn to alcohol and binge-eating (the Guardian, the Daily Mail): A Birkbeck-UCL study reveals sleep problems, burnout and drink dependency due to heavy workloads in the medical profession. 
  • Marketing the moon (the Telegraph - print only): Professor Ian Crawford discusses the new frontier of extraterrestrial exploration - mining the moon for potentially precious resources. 
  • The near-near future (BBC Culture): Professor Roger Luckhurst comments on the horror of sci-fi that does not imagine shiny, hard futures but gives a sense of sliding from one version of our present into something slightly alienated.

April 2019

March 2019

February 2019

  • Breast cancer and PTSD (Breast Cancer Care podcast): Professor Naz Derakshan discusses research on how PTSD affects women with breast cancer and what you can do to manage the symptoms.
  • Screen time and sleep (the Telegraph - print): A report cites research from the Birkbeck BabyLab indicating screen time can hamper the sleep patterns of young children. 
  • The resurgence of anti-Semitism (France 24): Dr Ben Gidley appears on a panel to discuss increasing anti-Semitism and attacks on Jewish people in France. 
  • Aristotle's Biology (In Our Time, BBC Radio 4): Dr Sophia Connell joins Melvyn Bragg to discuss the remarkable achievement of Aristotle in the realm of biological investigation.
  • Animal brain traits (Psychology Today): Dr Gillian Forrester says that because humans are exceptional in our ability to think and act in ways unlike any other animal on the planet, it is easy to forget that modern human abilities have origins in a shared evolutionary history.

January 2019

December 2018

November 2018

October 2018

  • The forgotten sex workers of WWI (Buzzfeed): Dr Clare Makepeace's research into the thousands of women working as sex workers during the First World War is the subject of a new Roundhouse art project, Cause & Effect
  • Prejudice in Britain (the Times): A report on new research from Birkbeck and Kent, on behalf of the EHRC, which reveals the extent of prejudice against minority groups in Britain. 
  • Like and subscribe (Daily World News)María Elena Placencia discusses how people perceive the importance of being complimented on social media, and how this varies by age and gender. 
  • The role of genetics in autism (Medical Health News): Dr Emma Meaburn comments on a study that suggests genetics play a larger role in autism than other conditions.
  • The loss of white identity? (The Times): Professor Eric Kaufmann discusses his new book, Whiteshift, which broadly argues that white identity in white-majority countries is under threat from non-white immigration, which has led to the triumph of populism and 'political entrepreneurs' like Trump. 
  • Making an entrance (the Guardian): the former Birkbeck students behind YESYESNONO are hailed as one of the UK's best young theatre companies.
  • League table exit (Metro, the Telegraph, the Daily Mail, BBC Radio 4, Times Higher Education and others): Birkbeck's decision to withdraw from UK league tables, which do not give an accurate decision of the strengths of the College, was widely discussed by the academic community and beyond. 
  • The diverse experience of UK refugees (BBC Online): Bada Yusuf, an Egyptian refugee who studies at Birkbeck as part of the Compass Project scholarship scheme, was featured in an exhibition which aimed to highlight the varied experiences of refugees.
  • Doctor burnout and stress (GPonline): a report on a Birkbeck-Bedfordshire study about the mental health crises among doctors, and recommendations to alleviate it. 

September 2018

August 2018

July 2018

June 2018

May 2018

  • Working class-writers (The Irish Times): Stephen Morrison-Burke discusses what being the first recipient of the Kit de Waal Creative Writing Scholarship at Birkbeck means to him. 
  • On the other hand (Discover): Dr Gillian Forrester discusses the evolutionary and developmental pathways to behaviours such as right- or left-handedness.
  • Teacher burn-out (The Observer): Professor Almuth McDowall contributed to a news-feature examining the pressures which are contributing to school teachers quitting the profession or being signed off with stress.
  • Examining Sure Start (BBC Sunday Politics): Professor Ted Melhuish was interviewed about the initiative, on the back of his leading role in National Evaluation of Sure Start, which examined the effectiveness of SS work.
  • Pupil reaction is autism marker (Daily Mail): Research from Birkbeck's BabyLab into how babies' reactions to light can be an indicator of autism received widespread media coverage in publications such as The Mirror, Metro, Express and The i Paper, as well as more than 100 online outlets.
  • New production is a homecoming for George (South London Press): Graduate George Richmond-Scott, who was awarded his MA in Theatre Direction at Birkbeck's spring graduation, was featured to highlight the way the College had enabled him to successfully change career.
  • Trump and Iran (TalkRadio): Professor Robert Singh was a contributor to an on-air discussion about the US President's decision to pull out of the Iran nuclear deal.
  • Brexit Ministry rejects FOI enquiries (The i Paper): Ben Worthy is among the experts consulted in a story about how four out of five FOI requests directed at DExEU are not fully answered.

APRIL 2018

MARCH 2018

February 2018

JANUARY 2018

DECEMBER 2017

November 2017

October 2017

SEPTEMBER 2017

August 2017

July 2017

June 2017

May 2017

April 2017

March 2017

February 2017

  • Burnout among oncologists (Guardian): Dr Caroline Kamau and PhD student Asta Medisauskaite's paper on alarming levels of burnout and stress in oncologists.
  • How voters decide (BBC Radio 4: Analysis): Professor Rosie Campbell presents this episode, looking at how voters make decisions on who to vote for.
  • Home truths (BBC1): Dr Paul Watt takes part in a documentary about the places we call home.
  • Trump and the Alt-Right (Sky News): Professor Eric Kaufmann is interviewed about Trump and the Alt-Right movement.
  • General strike against Trump (Washington Post): Professor John Kelly writes about the success and regularity of previous general strikes.
  • Trump and Russia (Share Radio): Professor Robert Singh is interviewed about Trump and his links to Russia.
  • Cold War lessons (Chatham House magazine - The World Today): Professor Daniel Pick and Dr Sara Marks write about how Cold War-era ideas of brainwashing and mind control can offer lessons for thinking about radicalisation and de-radicalisation today
  • Empty prisons (Seattle Times, International New York Times, El Periodico de Mexico and others): Data from Birkbeck's ICPR is quoted in widespread news coverage about the Netherlands' surplus of prison cells.
  • Welcoming Britain? (History Extra): Professor David Feldman writes about Britain's mixed historical record on welcoming refugees.
  • Autism detection (Health Medicine Network): a new project involving researchers from Birkbeck's Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development aims to introduce new low-cost ways of detecting autism in Indian children
  • Sociability in babies (Your Autism magazine [no link]): research from Birkbeck's Babylab shows that infants of adults who feel uncomfortable in social situations are more likely to experience social discomfort themselves.
  • Bedlam (History Today): Birkbeck alumna Anna Jamieson writes about the history of the Bedlam mental hospital and its place in the public imagination.
  • The cult next door (The Psychologist [no link]): Dr Alexandra Stein reviews BBC2's 'The cult next door'.
  • Bannon and antisemitism (Haaretz): Dr Dave Rich analyses White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon's attitude to Jews.

JANUARY 2017

  • Prevent (LBC radio [no link]): Professor Bill Bowring was interviewed about the Prevent strategy
  • Computer algorithms in recruitment (Talent Management): Dr Chris Dewberry comments on the reliability of computer algorithms in selecting suitable job candidates in Raconteur's special report.
  • Toddlers and iPads (no link): The TABLET project is mentioned in an article about children's use of tablet computers and smartphones.
  • Bank of England interest rates (The Times [no link]): Professor Anne Sibert has advised the Bank of England to increase interest rates and warns that Brexit is still a risk.
  • REF questions (Research Fortnight [no link]): Professor Martin Eve comments on the REF and how credit will be shared between institutions that have contributed to a piece of research.
  • Alumni programmes (University Business [no link]): Birkbeck's alumni programme is highlighted.
  • Helen Reece (Guardian): Daniel Monk writes Dr Helen Reece's obituary. Helen worked in the Law School at Birkbeck from 1998 to 2009.
  • Annette Karmiloff-Smith (The Psychologist [no link]): publishes Professor Annette Karmiloff-Smith's obituary. Annette worked in Birkbeck's Department of Psychological Sciences from 2006 to 2016.
  • Babies and language (BBC World News [link not available]): Dr Teodora Gliga discusses early brain development and language learning.
  • Experimental literature (BBC Radio 3: Free Thinking): Dr Mark Blacklock discusses experimental novels with Eimar McBride and Matthew Sweet.
  • Consumption and the environment (Guardian): Professor Frank Trentmann writes about why decluttering our cupboards won't save the planet.
  • Lammy and night schools (Evening Standard): In a letter, Professor David Latchman praised David Lammy MP for raising the issue of the importance of evening learning.
  • Heligoland (The Sunday Times [no link]): Professor Jan Ruger's new book Hegiloland. Britain, Germany and the Struggle for the North Sea is reviewed.
  • Design recognition (Design Week): Birkbeck's new visual identity.
  • Work-Life balance: a new study by Dr McDowall on the need for employers to help staff balance their personal and professional lives has received coverage in several outlets.
  • Jah Wobble (Skiddle): Birkbeck alumnus Jah Wobble (John Wardle) describes studying at Birkbeck as "the best thing [he] ever did" in an interview.
  • HE bill (WonkHE): Jonathan Woodhead writes about why part-time HE should be a priority in the government's HE bill.
  • Freud for our times (BBC Radio 4): Professor Daniel Pick presents a programme about psychoanalysis today.
  • Artistic direction: Birkbeck alumnus Jez Pike has become the artistic director of the Maddermarket Theatre and received widespread coverage in regional media.

December 2016

November 2016

October 2016

September 2016