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Nabhassorn Baines

Thesis topic

The use of capabilities for successful Product/Service Innovation in University Spin-off Companies

Abstract

Most of the studies in academic entrepreneurships appear to focus more on the macro-economic and infrastructural perspectives that support the creation of university spin-offs rather than at the firm level (Druilhe and Garnsey, 2004). There is deficiency of comprehensive empirical evidence to substantiate to what extent the idea of entrepreneurial university contributes to the economic development (Harrison and Leitch, 2010). Only a handful of studies have explored the survival and performance of spin-offs over time; this omission is significant (Lawton Smith and Ho, 2006). There is also a lack of study to capture their demographic information as well as to understand their product/service portfolio.

In a competitive market sphere, continuous development of new innovation is imperative in order to secure success beyond the launch of the company and create long-term economic value. In addition, product innovations are often pronounced as being important to firms’ competitiveness, and long term growth and development (Kock, et al. 2011). The development of successful products and services demands a greater deal than implementing a set of devices and methods. It not only involves a suitable organization and team, but also a clear process to facilitate and manage innovation (Tidd and Bessant, 2009). Different capabilities embedded in an organization have a positive effect on the outcome of the product development process (Verona, 1999).

Hence, in this study, the following questions are addressed: What are characteristics of products/services created and offered by university spin-off companies? What is the process of products/services development of university spin-off firms? What are important factors in successfully developing products/services in university spin-off context? What are difficulties and barriers in successfully developing products/services in university spin-off context? What are the dominant capabilities used by university spin-off firms to develop products/services? Do differences exist between each category of university spin-off firms, based on Druilhe and Garnsey (2004)’s typology (Consulting, Development, Product, and Software), when exploiting their capabilities to develop products and services?

Research interests / research methods

  • Academic entrepreneurship
  • University spin-offs
  • Product Innovation
  • Qualitative and Quantitative methods

Bio

Education

  • BA English Literature, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok;
  • MA Marketing Management, Middlesex University;
  • MSc E-Business and Innovation, Birkbeck, University of London

Professional / employment background

  • Research and Commercial Executive, Baines Associates
  • Assistant Director, Research and Development, INTO University Partnerships
  • Business Development/Marketing Officer, The Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, UCL
  • Assistant Director (Marketing), The British Council, Bangkok, Thailand

Publications

Completed research papers or books

  • Baines, N. and Lawton Smith, H. (2013), ‘Demystify Product and Service Innovation of University Spin-off Companies in the UK’ in the 11th Triple Helix International Conference, Bringing businesses, universities and governments together to co-innovate and solve economic, social and technological challenges, London, UK, 8-10 July2013
  • Lindholm Dahlstrand, A., Lawton Smith, H. and Baines, N (2013), ‘Technology transfer and entrepreneurship: IP and academic spin-offs in Sweden and the UK’, In: the 11th Triple Helix International Conference, Bringing businesses, universities and governments together to co-innovate and solve economic, social and technological challenges, London, UK, 8-10 July2013.
  • Baines, N. and Lawton Smith, H. (2011), ‘Product innovation, growth and profitability of university spin-off companies’, In: the 9th Triple Helix International Conference, Silicon Valley: Global Model or Unique Anomaly? Stanford University, California, USA ,11-14 July 2011.

Teaching

  • Marketing Principles and Practices, for undergraduate student
  • Entrepreneurship and Innovation, for undergraduate student

Supervisors

  • Professor Helen Lawton Smith, Department of Management
  • Dr Federica Rossi, Department of Management

Nabhassorn Baines

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