CALL FOR PAPER Special Issue of the Journal of Institutional Economics: “Institutions and Culture in Economic Contexts”

Special Guest Editors

Luca Andriani (Birkbeck university of London, luca.andriani@bbk.ac.uk)

Randolph Bruno (University College London, randolph.bruno@ucl.ac.uk)

Background

With this call, we explore the role of institutions, cultural traits, and cultural differences broadly defined on a variety of economic, social and institutional outcomes. The aim is to establish a dialogue between scholars of different disciplines who may interpret these concepts from different perspectives. We, thus, propose to ground the contributions submitted to this special issue in well-established conceptualisations of both culture and institutions, while leaving room for authors to operationalise the concepts as they see fit.

With this in mind, on the one hand we define institutions as “rules and norms able to constrain and shape human interactions as well as open up possibilities” (Hodgson 2006; North, 1990). On the other hand, the economic literature refers to culture as “those customary beliefs and values that ethnic, religious, and social groups transmit unchanged from generation to generation” (Guiso et al. 2006). In a wider perspective, culture is viewed as an important environmental factor consisting of a set of social-value orientations that distinguish the members of one group from those of another, shape collective preferences and individuals’ attitudes within a socio-economic and geographical space (De Jong 2009; Hofstede 1980; Schwartz, 2011).

The role of cultural aspects and their impact on organisational, market and business performance have been widely investigated in the context of managerial and business studies since the very seminal work of Hofstede in 1980 (Hofstede 1980).

Subsequent works have developed challenging and compelling critiques to the definition of culture proposed by Hofstede (e.g. McSweeney, 2002) as well as further approaches to the conceptualisation and measurement of cultural traits (Chanchani and Theivanathampillai, 2002; Inglehart and Baker, 2000; Kaasa et al. 2014; Kaasa 2015; Schnyder et al 2019; Taras et al., 2009; Voigt 2018). Similarly, culture, as a field of enquiry of relevance to economic and institutional outcomes, progressively gained attention in the broader economic literature and culminated with the emergence of New Cultural Economics as embodied in Guiso et al. (2006) and Tabellini (2008 and 2010). However, within the Institutional Economics, the interconnection between culture and institutions has been a recurrent, even though sometime latent, underlying theme. North (1990), for instance, argues that cultural traits such as sanctions, taboos, customs and traditions are informal constrains affecting individuals’ behaviour and actions. Hodgson (2006) relates the concept of culture to the interplay between formal and informal institutions within an expanding critical debate on the role of institutions in economics. Along with these two key references, a growing body of empirical and theoretical works has been showing that institutions and cultural factors matter on different economic and institutional performance (Acemoglu and Jackson 2017; Alesina and Giuliano 2015; Bruno et al. 2013; Douarin and Mickiewicz 2017; Edwards et al. 2019; Gorton et al. 2008; Greif 1994; Guiso et al 2006; Tabellini 2008, 2010; Williamson 2009). In this regard, in recent years, the Journal of Institutional Economics has provided a voice to pioneer empirical and conceptual works on the relationship between culture and different institutional and socio-economic aspects both in high income and developing countries (e.g. Andriani and Sabatini 2015; Berggren et al. 2019; Cruz-García and Peiró-Palomino 2019; Gerxhani and Van Breemen 2019; Herrmann-Pillath et al. 2019; Kyriacou and Lopez Velasquez 2015; Spranz et al. 2012; Tarabar 2019). However, in many circumstances, at present, culture and institutions are keywords belonging to two only partially converging research streams. Within this special issue, instead, we want to recognise a more systemic overlap between culture and informal institutions as being both social constructs, which are not formally enforced by others (Voigt, 2018). We also acknowledge significant challenges of interpretation, declination and delineation of the two concepts (Hodgson, 2006) especially when it comes to appropriate measurements (Voigt, 2018).

In other words, this special issue attempts to start filling this gap and to build an ad-hoc systemic platform for disseminating such a debate. To this purpose, we aim to bring together papers to improve the theoretical, empirical and methodological understanding of the role of institutions and culture in different geopolitical and socio-economic contexts as well as the role of economics in different institutional and cultural contexts. Particularly, we focus on how institutions and cultural aspects may provide contributions towards better understanding of economic outcomes. Contributions which can derive from individuals and social attitudes towards rent-seeking behaviours, corruption, tax evasion, and institutional trust, among others (Andriani 2016; Bruno 2019). We are also interested in studies investigating how cultural traits and institutions relate to different forms of economic and institutional performance. Hence, we invite contributions addressing issues including but not limited to:

  • Link between Culture, Formal and Informal Institutions
  • Social Norms, Trust, and Social Attitudes Towards Rent-Seeking Behaviours 
  • Measures of Culture and Cultural Dimensions
  • Culture, Corruption, Tax Evasion, and Tax Morale
  • Legal Institutions, Cultural Traits, and Governance 
  • Religiosity, Cultural Differences, and Institutions
  • Culture, Institutional Performance, and Institutional Trust
  • Cultural Differences, Social Capital, and Social Attitudes
  • Culture and Economic and/or Organisational Performance

Abstract Submission

We invite to submit an abstract of max 300 words by the 27th of January 2020 to luca.andriani@bbk.ac.uk. The abstract should include correspondence email and affiliation and should include “Institutions and Culture in Economic Context in the subject line. Submitted abstracts need to be structured as follow:

Research Type: Conceptual, Theoretical, Empirical or Review (select one)

Research Question/Issue: presentation of the focus and motivations of the paper, including relevant information regarding the link to culture and institutions and the definition and measurements chosen for these concepts.

Method: clarification of the methodological approach chosen, and data source, if the paper is conceptual/theoretical state the main framework your research builds on.

Key Findings/Insights: explanation of the findings or insights derived from the study. This section should highlight the contribution of the work to the broader literature.

Implications: in this section, please state the broader implications of the findings for researchers and/or policy-makers, as appropriate.

The abstracts will be assessed by the guest editors of this special issue along with the Editors of the Journal of Institutional Economics. The authors will be notified by the 18th of February 2020 regarding the acceptance or rejection of the abstracts. We expect the final papers to be submitted no later than 5th of May 2020 directly to the Journal of Institutional Economics.

Please note that the acceptance of abstracts does not necessarily imply the acceptance of the paper for the special issue. All the paper submissions will go through the Journal of Institutional Economics regular review process and follow the standard norms and processes.

For any query, please contact any of the guest editors: Luca Andriani (luca.andriani@bbk.ac.uk) and/or Randolph Bruno (randolph.bruno@ucl.ac.uk)    

References

Acemoglu, D. and M. O. Jackson (2017), “Social Norms and the Enforcement of Laws,” Journal of the European Economic Association, 15(2): 245–295.

Alesina, A. and P. Giuliano (2015), “Culture and Institutions,” Journal of Economic Literature, 53(4): 898–944

Andriani, L and Sabatini, F (2015) Trust and prosocial behaviour in a process of state capacity building: the case of the Palestinian Territories, Journal of Institutional Economics 11(4): 823-846

Andriani, L (2016) Tax Morale and Prosocial Behaviour: Evidence from a Palestinian Survey, Cambridge Journal of Economics, 40(3): 821-841

Berggren, N., Ljunge, M., & Nilsson, T. (n.d.). Roots of tolerance among second-generation immigrants. Journal of Institutional Economics, 1-18.

Bruno, R. L Bytchkova, M and Estrin S (2013), Institutional determinants of new firm entry in Russia: A cross-regional analysis, Review of Economics and Statistics 95 (5), 1740-1749      

Bruno, R. L. (2019), Tax enforcement, tax compliance and tax morale in transition economies: A theoretical model, European Journal of Political Economy

Chanchani S., Theivanathampillai P. (2002) Typologies of culture. University of Otago, Department of Accountancy and Business Law Working Papers Series, 04_10/02, University of Otago, Dunedin.

Cruz-García, P., & Peiró-Palomino, J. (2019). Informal, formal institutions and credit: Complements or substitutes? Journal of Institutional Economics, 15(4): 649-671.

De Jong E (2011) Culture, institutions and economic growth, Journal of Institutional Economics 7(4): 523-527

De Jong, E. (2009), Culture and Economics: On Values, Economics and International Business, New York, NY: Routledge

Douarin, L and Mickiewicz, T (2017) Economics of Institutional Change: Central and Eastern Europe Revisited, Palgrave Macmillan, London, Third Edition

Edwards, T Schnyder, G and Fortwengel, J (2019) Mapping the impact of home-and host-country institutions on human resource management in emerging market multinational companies: a conceptual framework, Thunderbird International Business Review 61 (3), 531-544

Gerxhani, K. and Van Breemen, J. (2019). Social values and institutional change: An experimental study. Journal of Institutional Economics 15(2): 259-280.

Gorton, M. Douarin, E. Davidova, S and Latruffe, L (2008) Attitudes to agricultural policy and farming futures in the context of the 2003 CAP reform: a comparison of farmers in selected established and new Member States, Journal of Rural Studies, 24(3): 322-336

Greif, A. (1994), ‘Cultural Beliefs and the Organization of Society: A Historical and Theoretical Reflection on Collectivist and Individualistic Societies’, Journal of Political Economy, 102: 912–950.

Guiso, L., P. Sapienza and L. Zingales (2006), “Does Culture affect Economic Outcomes? Journal of Economic Perspectives, 20(2): 23–48.

Herrmann-Pillath, C., Feng, X., & Guo, M. (n.d.). Entrepreneurs and ritual in China’s economic culture. Journal of Institutional Economics, 1-15.

Hodgson, G. M. (2006), ‘What are Institutions?’, Journal of Economic Issues, 40(1): 1–25 North, D. C. (1990), Institutions, Institutional Change and Economic Performance, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Hofstede, G. (1980), Culture’s Consequences: International Differences in Work-Related Values, Beverly Hills, CA: Sage Publications.

Inglehart, R., Baker, W. E. (2000) Modernization, cultural change, and the persistence of traditional values. American Sociological Review, 65(1, Special issue, Looking Forward, Looking Back: Continuity and Change at the Turn of the Millenium): 19–51.

Kaasa, A Vadi, M and Varblane, U (2014) Regional Cultural Differences Within European Countries: Evidence from Multi-Country Surveys, Management International Review 54: 825-852  

Kaasa, A (2015) Culture, religion and social capital: evidence from European regions, International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, 35(11/12) 772-794

Kyriacou, A. P. (2016), “Individualism-Collectivism, Governance and Economic Development,” European Journal of Political Economy, 42: 91–104.

Kyriacou, A. P. and F. J. López Velásquez (2015), “Inequality and Culture in a Cross-Section of Countries,” Journal of Institutional Economics, 11(1): 141–166.

McSweeney, B. (2002) Hofstede’s model of national cultural differences and their consequences: a triumph of faith – a failure of analysis. Human Relations, 55(1): 89–118.

Schnyder, G, Bothello, J, Nason, RS (2019) Institutional Voids and Organization Studies: Towards an epistemological ruptureOrganization Studies, 1-14

Schwartz, S. H. (2011) Values: Cultural and Individual. In: van de Vijver, F. J. R., Chasiotis, A., Breugelmans, S. M. (Eds.) Fundamental questions in cross-cultural psychology, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 463-493.

Spranz, R Lenger, A and Goldschmidt, N (2012) The relation between institutions and cultural factors in economic development: the case of Indonesia, Journal of Institutional Economic 8(4): 459-488   

Tabellini, G. (2008), ‘Institutions and Culture’, Journal of the European Economic Association, 6: 255–294.

Tabellini, G. (2010), ‘Culture and Institutions: Economic Development in the Regions of Europe’, Journal of the European Economic Association, 8: 677–716

Tarabar, D. (2019) Does national culture change as countries develop? Evidence from generational cleavages Journal of Institutional Economics 15, 397-412

Taras, V., Rowney, J., Steel, P. (2009) Half a Century of Measuring Culture: Review of Approaches, Challenges, and Limitations Based on the Analysis of 121 Instruments for Quantifying Culture. Journal of International Management, 15: 357-373.

Voigt, S. (2018). How to measure informal institutions. Journal of Institutional Economics, 14, 1-22.

Williamson, C. (2009), ‘Culture Rule: Institutional Arrangements and Economic Performance’, Public Choice, 139: 371–387

Call for Papers: One-day Workshop on Institutions and Culture in Economic Contexts

Venue: Birkbeck University of London, UK

Date: 20 June 2019

Organisers: The Centre for Political Economy and Institutional Studies (Birkbeck University of London), The Centre for Comparative Studies of Emerging Economies (University College London), and The Institute for International Management (Loughborough University London)

Overview

This one-day workshop aims to bring together researchers from different disciplines to improve our theoretical, empirical and methodological understanding of the role of institutions and culture in different geopolitical and socio-economic contexts. A growing body of empirical and theoretical work shows that institutions and cultural aspects matter for a variety of economic, social and institutional outcomes, in high income as well as in emerging and developing economies. However, still, at present, culture and institutions are keywords belonging to two distinct research streams that rarely meet to engage in an interactive and constructive debate. This workshop aims to build an ad-hoc research platform for such a debate. We are interested in studies that address the role of institutions, cultural traits, and cultural differences on a variety of economic, social and institutional outcomes. Particularly, we focus on different contributions that institutions and cultural aspects may provide to better understand individuals and social attitudes towards rent-seeking behaviours, corruption, tax evasion, and institutional trust, among others. We are also interested in studies investigating how cultural traits and institutions relate to different forms of economic and institutional performance.

We welcome contributions from different academic disciplines (including, but not limited to, political science, economics, development studies, law, sociology and social psychology, and organisational studies), using different units of analysis (individuals, firms and organisations, sectoral, regional, country, cross-country level, etc.) and different methodologies and techniques (theoretical, empirical, qualitative, and quantitative)

We invite submission of papers from any relevant discipline addressing issues including but not limited to:

  • Culture, Formal and Informal Institutions
  • Social Norms, Trust, and Social Attitudes Towards Rent-Seeking Behaviours
  • Measures of Culture and Cultural Dimensions
  • Culture, Corruption, Tax Evasion, and Tax Morale
  • Legal institutions, Cultural Traits, and Governance
  • Religiosity, Cultural Differences, and Institutions
  • Culture, Institutional Performance, and Institutional Trust
  • Cultural Differences, Social Capital, and Social Attitudes

 

Keynote speakers

Geoffrey Hodgson, Professor of Management, Institute for International Management of Loughborough University, UK. Chief Editor of the Journal of Institutional Economics

Anneli Kaasa, Associate Professor of Economics, School of Economics and Business Administration, University of Tartu, Estonia

 

 Application Deadline 

Submit a structured abstract (max. 500 words) by 24th April 2019 to ssees-events@ucl.ac.uk

The submission should be sent with “Institutions and Culture in Economic Context” in the subject line

Structured abstracts: Submitted abstracts need to explicitly follow the following structure:

Research Type: Conceptual, Theoretical, Empirical or Review (select one)

Research Question/Issue: 1 or 2 sentences presenting the focus of the paper

Method: 2 or 3 sentences clarifying the methodological approach chosen, and data source, if the paper is conceptual/theoretical state the main framework your research builds on.

Key Findings/Insights: 2 to 3 sentences explaining the findings or insights derived from your study. This section should highlight the contribution of your work to the broader literature.

Implications: in this section, please state the broader implications of your findings for researchers and/or policy-makers, as appropriate.

Authors of accepted abstracts will be notified by 6th of May 2019.

 

Workshop Fees

There is no fee for attending the workshop. Participants will be offered lunch, coffee and snacks during breaks, and are invited to a closing reception with wine and nibbles.

Participants are however expected to cover for their own travel and accommodation costs.

 

Structure of Presentations:

Every paper presentation will be assigned a discussant. It is thus important to submit full papers two weeks before the workshop.

 

Convenors and Queries

For any queries, please contact any of the workshop convenors: Dr Luca Andriani (luca.andriani@bbk.ac.uk), Dr Randolph L Bruno (Randolph.bruno@ucl.ac.uk), Dr Elodie Douarin (e.douarin@ucl.ac.uk) and Dr Gerhard Schnyder (G.Schnyder@lboro.ac.uk)

 

New Institutional Research Seminar: Understanding the Modern Business Corporation

Time: Wednesday 13 March 1pm

Location: Loughborough University of London, Room 2.05

Presentations

Gerhard Schneider and Philipp Kern, Loughborough University London, “Investigating New Types of ‘Decoupling’: Minority Shareholder Protection in the Law and Corporate Practice”

David Gindis, University of Hertfordshire, “A Critical Appraisal of Corporate Abolitionism”

Call for Abstract – Envisioning the future. Alternative economies, collectives and communities – Lille 3-5 July 2019

Call for Papers – Panel organised by the IIPPE Social Capital Working Group

 THEME: Envisioning the future. alternative economies, collectives and communities

 Asimina Christoforou, Athens University of Economics and Business

Luca Andriani, Birkbeck, University of London

 

A social capital panel on Envisioning the Future. Alternative Economies, Collectives and Communities will be held within the 2019 IIPPE annual conference in Lille, 3-5 July 2019. The deadline for abstracts submissions is January 29 2019.

Collective and community economies represent alternative ways of dealing with important issues such as deprivations, inequalities and conflicts. These alternative economic approaches rely on the strength of social norms and networks of cooperation and solidarity challenging conventional universals of homo economicus. They can be found in a variety of collective efforts and initiatives, which include, but are not restricted to, cooperative production in worker-recuperated enterprises; social kitchens and second-hand stores for the satisfaction of basic needs; community and environmental movements against reckless urban and industrial expansion; alternative currencies and microfinance institutions for local exchange and credit.

In light of these developments, we invite proposals for papers to be presented in the Social Capital Working Group’s panels at IIPPE’s Annual Conference. Proposals could examine the development of alternative collective and community economies in different parts of the world and investigate their potential to combat the individualisation and marketisation of human action and to create transformational relations toward a cooperative and solidaristic economy and society. Many studies have pointed to the critical role of social capital as norms and networks of trust, reciprocity and collaboration in creating values and institutions of cooperation, democracy and welfare. Yet some point to the possibility of degeneration as a result of inherent tensions between economic and social objectives and the pressures of a global environment where the pursuit of economic profit and cost-competitiveness prevail. These are hypotheses that need to be further theorised and empirically tested in order to uncover the role of social norms and networks in developing alternative perceptions and practices of working and living on the basis of cooperative values and institutions.

We also encourage contributions that generally address the topic of social capital. We welcome works that derive from various social science disciplines and use different units of analysis (individual, regional, country or cross-country level), methodologies and techniques (theoretical, empirical, qualitative and quantitative).

SUBMISSION INFO:

 SUBMISSION DEADLINE: Please submit your proposal by January 15, 2019.

 SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS:

To submit a proposal, please go to the IIPPE home page http://iippe.org/ and check “Submit proposal”. You will be transferred to the Electronic Proposal Form (EPF) located at https://afep-iippe2019.sciencesconf.org/. There you first need to register on the platform and create an account. (For English, select the small English flag near the upper left corner of the page.)

To register, click on the down arrow next to the “Login” button in the upper right corner of the page, and then select “Create account”. Fill in the simple information and submit, and you will get a response for confirmation sent to the email address given. Once you have done that, you can submit a proposal.

To submit, select “Submission” from the left column. “Step 1: Instructions” gives you all the instructions that are necessary beyond the obvious ones provided during the submission process by the site. “Step 2: Submit” takes you to the submission process itself.

When you submit, be sure to select IIPPE Paper under the category “Type”. Only after that will a category “Topic” with the list of Working Groups appear. Please choose “Social Capital Working Group” to submit to our panel. 

GENERAL INFO:

For queries and suggestions, you may contact Asimina Christoforou, Coordinator of the Social Capital Working Group: asimina.christoforou@gmail.com.

For general information about IIPPE, Working Groups, and the Conference: http://iippe.org/wp/.

New Institutional Research Seminar Series: Rationing by Racing

Time: Thursday 6 Dec at 1pm

Place: Loughborough University London, Harvard Lecture Theatre on the 1st floor, Here East, Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park

 

Douglas Allen is a Canadian economist and the Burnaby Mountain Professor of Economics at Simon Fraser University, British Columbia, Canada. He is known for his research on transaction costs and property rights, and how these influence the structure of organizations and institutions. His research covers four broad areas: transaction cost theory, economic history, agricultural organizations, and the family. See more information on https://www.sfu.ca/~allen/

New Institutional Research Seminar Series: Why Institutional Research Needs to be Interdisciplinary

Inaugural Event of the new Seminar Series on Institutional Research

Organisers: Birkbeck Centre for Political economy and Institutional Studies (CPEIS) and Loughborough University London

Date and Time: Tuesday 23 October 2018, 14.00 – 16.00

Location: Birkbeck, University of London, 30 Russell Square, Room 101

Sponsor: Department of Management, Birkbeck University of London

Overview

This is the inaugural seminar of a new Seminar Series on Institutional Research organised jointly by Loughborough University London and Birkbeck Centre for Political Economy and Institutional Studies. The seminar will host the following guest speakers:

  • Geoffrey Hodgson, Loughborough University London: “Does mainstream economics understand institutions?”
  • Francesca Gagliardi, University of Hertfordshire: “Institutional Complementarity: A buzzword or a useful tool for interdisciplinary institutional research and policy making?”
  • Klaus Nielsen, Birkbeck, University of London: “The ‘institutional turn’ the social sciences”

Moderator: Luca Andriani, Birkbeck University of London and CPEIS

The seminar will be followed by a social event with drinks and snacks immediately after the seminar   at 16.00-17.00.

Seminar: Geo-economics of the Asia Pacific; TPP, AIIB and the Trump Shock

Date and Time: 26 June 2018, 6pm-8pm

Location: Room MAL B35, Malet Street, Birkbeck College, London, WC1E 7HX, United Kingdom

Description

In the contemporary Asia Pacific, great power rivalry has unfolded not only in security and military affairs, but also more prominently through economic interactions in the area of trade and investment. Hence, geo-economics, an admixture of the logic of conflict with the methods of commerce, (Luttwak 1990, 19), has become an important component of power politics in the region.

In the area of trade, despite President Trump’s withdrawal from the Transpacific Partnership (TPP) agreement in January 2017, the remaining 11 countries have managed to agree and sign the TPP-11 in March 2018. In the area of investment, China’s ambition through the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) and the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) is reshaping the region’s economic landscape. This talk with Proffessor Saori N. Katada focuses on these economic developments in the last five years and examines how these initiatives shape the regional economic order. 

Saori N. Katada is Associate Professor at School of International Relations at University of Southern California. She is a co-author of two new books: The BRICS and Collective Financial Statecraft (Oxford University Press, 2017), and Taming Japan’s Deflation: The Debate over Unconventional Monetary Policy (Cornell University Press, forthcoming November 2018). Her single-authored book Banking on Stability: Japan and the Cross-Pacific Dynamics of International Financial Crisis Management (University of Michigan Press, 2001) received Masayoshi Ohira Memorial Book Award. She has also published six edited and co-edited books and numerous articles on the subjects of trade, financial and monetary cooperation in East Asia as well as Japanese foreign aid. She is currently working on a book manuscript on Japan’s foreign economic policy and East Asian regionalism. For her research on regionalism, she was recently awarded Asia Studies Fellow at the East-West Center in Washington, Japan Foundation Research Grant and National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship. She has her Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Political Science) in 1994, and B.A. from Hitotsubashi University (Tokyo). Before joining USC, she served as a researcher at the World Bank in Washington D.C., and as International Program officer at the UNDP in Mexico City.

Tickets can be booked through eventbrite

For more information about this event please contact Dr Ali Burak Guven (a.guven@bbk.ac.uk)

This event is jointly hosted by the Department of Politics, Birkbeck, the Centre for Political Economy and Institutional Studies, Birkbeck and UCL Centre for Comparative Studies of Emerging Economies